Why the young are feeling worse off

first_img Tags: NULL by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMisterStoryWoman Files For Divorce After Seeing This Photo – Can You See Why?MisterStoryMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailTotal PastThe Ingenious Reason There Are No Mosquitoes At Disney WorldTotal PastPeople TodayNewborn’s Strange Behavior Troubles Mom, 40 Years Later She Finds The Reason Behind ItPeople TodaySerendipity TimesInside Coco Chanel’s Eerily Abandoned Mansion Frozen In TimeSerendipity TimesBetterBe20 Stunning Female AthletesBetterBeElite HeraldExperts Discover Girl Born From Two Different SpeciesElite Heraldautooverload.comDeclassified Vietnam War Photos The Public Wasn’t Meant To Seeautooverload.comDrivepedia20 Of The Most Underrated Vintage CarsDrivepedia whatsapp whatsapp Why the young are feeling worse off More From Our Partners LA news reporter doesn’t seem to recognize actor Mark Currythegrio.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgFans call out hypocrisy as Tebow returns to NFL while Kaepernick is still outthegrio.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgKansas coach fired for using N-word toward Black playerthegrio.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgPorsha Williams engaged to ex-husband of ‘RHOA’ co-star Falynn Guobadiathegrio.comColin Kaepernick to publish book on abolishing the policethegrio.comFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comFort Bragg soldier accused of killing another servicewoman over exthegrio.comMark Eaton, former NBA All-Star, dead at 64nypost.comMan on bail for murder arrested after pet tiger escapes Houston homethegrio.comSidney Crosby, Alex Ovechkin are graying and frayingnypost.comA ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comMatt Gaetz swindled by ‘malicious actors’ in $155K boat sale boondogglenypost.com Sharecenter_img Show Comments ▼ FORGET about class war; we are entering a new era of generational wars. There is a growing sense among younger people that they won’t enjoy as prosperous a life as their parents. It is easy to understand such concerns: powerful economic, technological, demographic and political forces are forcing the generations apart.For a start, the old system of final salary pensions is in terminal decline, so younger people will have to work longer than the cosseted baby-boom generation, for an uncertain retirement income. The property boom has delivered a one-off windfall to millions of older people, while making it harder for younger people to jump onto the housing ladder. The cost to students of university education, once entirely provided at taxpayers’ expense, is rocketing. Older pensioners often earned a good living from unskilled jobs; today, returns from such occupations have collapsed, hitting a large number of youngsters failed by the school system. Last but not least, pensioners are being largely shielded from spending cuts, further exacerbating the generational gap. House prices increased fourfold in the 20 years to 2007. Many owner-occupiers on modest incomes, including pensioners who bought council houses at a discount, made a fortune. Wealth is thus often not synonymous with a high income: 2.6 per cent of UK adults are dollar millionaires – but only 0.6 per cent of adults earn more than £150,000 a year. Wealth has accrued largely through capital gains in the property market – younger people won’t benefit in the same way. While it is extremely bad news for millions of younger people, two sub-groups will nevertheless do well over the very long-run even in the present environment. Those with a superior education – either through good fortune or through sheer effort – and of course those whose parents have built up housing wealth and who stand to inherit vast sums of money. University graduates earn 50 per cent more than those with just a secondary education. The return on investment for an individual obtaining university education is around 10 per cent, higher than the return on UK equities or housing in the last 20 years, estimates Deloitte’s chief economist Ian Stewart – some consolation perhaps for recent graduates who cannot afford a deposit. To this I would add two crucial caveats: what will increasingly count is not any old university degree but going to a good university and studying for a good, rigorous qualification. Knowledge based industries that require high levels of skill, including finance and technology, have emerged as a major source of high-paid jobs in the modern, ultra-competitive globalised world. Cognitive skills are especially valuable – but so are any useful skills, from plumbing to high-level cooking. People with good vocational training ought, in many cases, to be able to earn a lot too – we need a new generation of technical colleges. What else should be done? Young people should save and invest as much as possible, even if they can’t afford a house. And they should try and acquire the best, most marketable skills possible – and invest in the right kind of education. The government, for its part, must tear up planning rules to make it easier to build new homes – and it must sort out the education system. This won’t resolve the crisis facing millions of younger people but it would be a good [email protected] me on Twitter: @allisterheath KCS-content Thursday 3 March 2011 8:23 pmlast_img read more

Tanzania Portland Cement Company Limited (TWIGA.tz) HY2013 Interim Report

first_imgTanzania Portland Cement Company Limited (TWIGA.tz) listed on the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchange under the Building & Associated sector has released it’s 2013 interim results for the half year.For more information about Tanzania Portland Cement Company Limited (TWIGA.tz) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Tanzania Portland Cement Company Limited (TWIGA.tz) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Tanzania Portland Cement Company Limited (TWIGA.tz)  2013 interim results for the half year.Company ProfileTanzania Portland Cement Company Limited (TPCC) is a leading cement producer in Tanzania. The company produces cement for the local market and for export to countries in Central and East Africa. The company owns, operates and manages cement factories, grinding plants and terminals as well as cement retail and distribution outlets. TPCC markets its cement products under the following brands; Twiga Extra, Twiga Jenja, Twiga Plus and Twiga Ordinary. TPCC was founded in 1959 by Cementia Holdings AG of Switzerland; nationalised in 1973 and privatised in 1998. It is a subsidiary of Scancem International DA, which has been consolidated into Heidelberg Cement Group of the Federal Republic of Germany and is now known as Heidelberg Cement Africa (HC Africa). Heidelberg Cement Africa operates in seven sub-Saharan countries and has its headquarters in Oslo, Norway. Tanzania Portland Cement Company Limited is listed on the Dar es Salaam Stock Exchangelast_img read more

Congo Anglicans reach out to Pygmy community

first_img Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs By Bellah ZuluPosted Aug 8, 2014 Rector Collierville, TN The Pygmy people’s appearance and lifestyle means they have also been marginalized by much of society (2). Photo: Creative.org[Anglican Communion News Service] The Anglican Church in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is breaking new ground by bringing help and hope to a Pygmy1. community living in the country’s forests. Pygmy peoples live in several ethnic groups across the forests of central Africa. There are an estimated 250,000 to 600,000 living in the Congo rainforest alone.These forest dwellers have lived by hunting and gathering for millennia. But in the past few decades their homelands have been devastated by logging, war and encroachment from farmers. Their appearance and lifestyle means they have also been marginalized by much of society2.Bringing helpIn an interview with ACNS , the Provincial Youth Worker for the Province de L’Eglise Anglicane Du Congo the Revd Bisoke Balikenga revealed that he is talking with the Pygmy community to find out how he and other Anglicans there can best meet its needs.Earlier this year, Mr Balikenga and a team of other youth workers visited Bamande, a Pygmy settlement in the heart of the Equatorial rain forest. “We went to give them food and to find out how we can reach them with the Word of God,” he explained. “They were saying that they also want to learn how to read and write.”Mr Balikenga explained that locals have been hiring the Pygmy people in Bamande to do basic chores such as laundry for them. The wages are very small: “[The Pygmy people] are surviving on less than a dollar a week,” he said.“We gave them beans and salt and it was nice to see their reactions because many of them did not think that any church, including the Anglican Church could help them,” he said. “It is really nice to work with Pygmies because they have been neglected by many people for a long time.“We need to organise seminars and workshops for them so that they can learn how to read and write,” he said. “We need to teach them about their health and where they can get the right medicine when they have a problem since most of them still rely on traditional medicines which are not always effective.He added: “The Church activities are going well but we still need to do more. These people need food since a lot of them are dying of starvation, and clothes.”Bringing hopeThe Anglican Church is also thinking about how best to bring the Gospel to these forest people. “We need more evangelistic teaching among Pygmies,” said Mr Balikenga who explained that there were other churches trying to help, but were not going far enough to help Pygmy communities.Mr Balikenga said that, regardless of their lifestyle, their poverty or lack of formal education, the Pygmy people deserve to be treated with dignity: “They should still be considered like any other human being with rights.”By meeting both their physical and spiritual needs the Province de L’Eglise Anglicane Du Congo aims to do just that. “We need to give hope to Pygmies who are mostly neglected by the society here in Congo,” he said.Notes1. The term ‘Pygmy’ has gained negative connotations, but has been reclaimed by some indigenous groups as a term of identity2. The conflict in the DRC was especially brutal for the country’s Pygmy peoples, who suffered killings and rape. In August 2008, nearly 100 were released from slavery in DRC, of whom almost half came from families who had been enslaved for generations – See http://www.survivalinternational.org/tribes/pygmies Rector Bath, NC August 8, 2014 at 5:19 pm I think that the best way to reach these people with the Gospel is to start by offering to help with their stated needs and then by asking them about how God is already acting in their lives. We would be amiss if we assume we are bring the Gospel to anyone. God is there, our job is always to first listen to what others tell you about their spiritual experiences. Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Washington, DC Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Peggy Thompson says: Press Release Service An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Africa, Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Albany, NY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Comments (1) Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Comments are closed. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT center_img Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Congo Anglicans reach out to Pygmy community Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Anglican Communion Featured Events Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Director of Music Morristown, NJ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Submit an Event Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Featured Jobs & Calls Curate Diocese of Nebraska TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Job Listing Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI last_img read more

Pakistan: Multifaith vigil for Lahore Easter bomb victims

first_img Featured Events April 5, 2016 at 8:04 am It was good report, but very sad that our whole nation is not save. in this moment of grief we pray for the victims and consolation for their family. May God Change their mind and heart so they can realize the respect of humanity. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Christians, Muslims and Hindus light candles and join in prayer at the site of last week’s bomb attack in the Gulshan-e Iqbal park in Lahore, which resulted in the deaths of at least 76 people and 300 people being injured. Photo: Diocese of Raiwind[Anglican Communion News Service] About 200 Christians, Muslims and Hindus gathered April 4 at the site of last weekend’s horrific Easter Day bomb attack for a united act of solidarity and sympathy for the victims of the attack.The death toll from the attack rose to 76 on Friday as Pakistan officials said that some of those who had been injured in the attack did not survive. More than 300 people were hurt and several dozen are still understood to be undergoing treatment in hospital. Some of these are in a serious condition.This weekend’s gathering at the Gulshan-e Iqbal Park began with a peaceful demonstration at 5:40 p.m. – the exact moment that last week’s blast occurred.Candles were lit and Christian, Muslim and Hindu religious leaders – including the Moderator of the Church of Pakistan, Bishop Samuel Azariah – joined hands as they prayed for the victims and their families.Among the 200 people present were representatives from the Episcopal Church’s Diocese of Louisiana and the Presbyterian Church of Scotland. The Church of Pakistan is a United Church. In addition to being a province of the Anglican Communion it is also a member of the World Council of Reformed Churches and the World Methodist Council.The Taliban off-shoot Jamaat-ul-Ahrar has claimed responsibility for the suicide bombing, saying that the target of the attack was Christians celebrating Easter. But the indiscriminate nature of the suicide bombing, near the entrance to the women and children’s section of the Gulshan-e Iqbal park, meant that many more Muslims were killed and injured than Christians.Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby wrote about the attack in a column for the UK’s Financial Times newspaper.“Lahore is a place I know well,” Welby wrote. “Two years ago, I visited the city to meet Christian leaders and to pray with them. The stories I heard troubled me deeply. There was a real feeling that the Christians of Pakistan were under intense pressure, fearing to worship, even fearing for their lives. Last Sunday’s murderous actions do nothing to dispel that feeling.“Pakistan was founded on a vision of a country at peace with itself and at peace with its minorities. Indeed, the white on the national flag represents the place of minorities within the country. The security and flourishing of minorities was a foundational principle. This founding vision is now under grave threat.“The friend I spoke to this week, who lives daily with intimidation and pressure, listened politely; he thanked me for my words of sorrow for the victims and condemnation of such dreadful atrocities. But then he said: “Justin, condemnation is not enough, we must go beyond condemnation to something better.”“Beyond condemnation? What could that mean?”He went on to explain that while it was important for leaders to “condemn unequivocally the persecution of Christians and other minorities around the world,” it was also “vital that concrete action is taken.” States must ensure people are free to practice their religion and diplomatic pressure must be applied to ensure that no country “accidentally or deliberately, supports the persecution of anyone for their religious belief.”This was not a task for political leaders alone, he said, and he argued that religious leaders such as himself had to “up their game” and set an example through dialogue and communication with each other, and be prepared to hold each other to account. “This requires honest and robust relationships between religious leaders, not platitudes, however well-intentioned. Such relationships involve encouraging each other actively to protect minorities and to challenge those who seek to exploit differences.”On Saturday, Punjab’s Chief Minister, Shahbaz Sharif held a reception to pay tribute to the many police, rescue and medical staff who responded to the attack, saying that by their “noble example” they had saved many lives and had become “heroes of the nation.” Submit an Event Listing Anglican Communion, This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Jobs & Calls Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Washington, DC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Comments (2) In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Tags Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Asia, Rector Tampa, FL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Submit a Press Release Comments are closed. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Bath, NC AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI By Gavin DrakePosted Apr 4, 2016 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Emmanuel Fazal says: Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Emmanuel Fazal says: Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL April 5, 2016 at 8:09 am The pain and shock of this attack is beyond expressing in words. All I can say is it that is a crime against humanity. It gives me deep pain that why these terrorists are so cruel and without a human heart. What kind of teachings and mentality. Ecumenical & Interreligious Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Pakistan: Multifaith vigil for Lahore Easter bomb victims Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Albany, NY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Knoxville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector Columbus, GAlast_img read more

House ALM / Estudio ODS

first_imgShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/786275/house-alm-estudio-ods Clipboard Photographs CopyHouses, Renovation•Tavira, Portugal ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/786275/house-alm-estudio-ods Clipboard House ALM / Estudio ODSSave this projectSaveHouse ALM / Estudio ODS House ALM / Estudio ODS Portugal 2012 Area:  185 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project Projects Architects: Estudio ODS Area Area of this architecture project Year:  “COPY” ArchDaily Houses “COPY” Save this picture!© Ricardo Santos+ 19 Share Photographs:  Ricardo SantosSave this picture!© Ricardo SantosRecommended ProductsDoorsECLISSESliding Pocket Door – ECLISSE LuceDoorsRabel Aluminium SystemsMinimal Sliding Door – Rabel 62 Slim Super ThermalEnclosures / Double Skin FacadesRodecaRound Facade at Omnisport Arena ApeldoornDoorsSaliceSliding Door System – Slider S20Text description provided by the architects. Town house refurbishment in Tavira, Portugal.In an consolidated urban context of Tavira inner city an narrow lot with peculiar limits holds a old house with two floors and a roof attic. Over time the lot has changed its limits and new constructions were had blocking the natural light and ventilation. The house is located between two streets; the main access is made in the north side and a secondary access is made by the south throw a especially narrow corridor.Save this picture!© Ricardo SantosThe depth of the lot suggest us a courtyard in the middle that allows natural light and ventilation to come inside. The courtyard works as the new center of the house in which an exterior three level promenade is initiated.Save this picture!© Ricardo SantosSave this picture!AxonometricSave this picture!© Ricardo SantosThe exterior stair works has a connection element of the three levels promenade; starting in the ground floor courtyard which offers light and ventilation to the living room and the kitchen; following to the next level terrace to a raised water tank; the last level terrace offers a unique view cityscape view of Tavira and a roof attic.Save this picture!© Ricardo SantosThe program is separated by levels: ground floor holds the social areas; entrance room; living room; kitchen and wc; the first floor holds the private areas with the two bedrooms and a bathroom. The roof attic a extra space is offered with direct relation with the terrace.Save this picture!© Ricardo SantosThe materials used seek for the simplicity found in Algarve’s vernacular architecture; in the ground floor the hydraulic mosaics cover all the interior spaces; the first floor solid wood for private areas and outside areas a grey polished concrete covers all the areas.A red door spots the house in both elevations.Save this picture!© Ricardo SantosProject gallerySee allShow lessSchool Group in France / rhb architectesSelected ProjectsMosman Bay House / iredale pedersen hook architectsSelected Projects Share CopyAbout this officeEstudio ODSOffice•••ProductConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousesRefurbishmentRenovationTaviraPortugalPublished on May 08, 2016Cite: “House ALM / Estudio ODS” 08 May 2016. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPartitionsSkyfoldChoosing the Skyfold Wall for Your SpaceGlass3MSun Control Film – Prestige ExteriorShowerhansgroheShowers – Croma SelectWall / Ceiling LightsSpectrum LightingLED Downlight – Infinium 3″ Round FlangelessVentilated / Double Skin FacadeCosentinoDekton Cladding in LD Sevilla hotelSealantsSikaJoint SealingBeams / PillarsLunawoodThermowood Frames and BearersPorcelain StonewareApariciPorcelain Tiles – MarblesCeramicsTerrealTerracotta Facade in Manchester HospitalWindowspanoramah!®ah! CornerHome AppliancesGIRAGira Keyless in – Door communicationLightsLinea Light GroupIntegrated Lighting – Fylo+More products »Save想阅读文章的中文版本吗?ALM 住宅 / Estudio ODS是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

Legacy boom years predicted as baby boomers begin to die out

first_img Howard Lake | 22 May 2014 | News Tagged with: legacies Research / statistics About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. The report says:“2030-2040 will be legacy boom years thanks to a happy combination of stronger economic growth, accelerating death rates and more childless deaths. Over this period, real growth rates are expected to reach 3.1 per cent p.a. – outpacing the nineties boom.” Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis9 The fourth decade of the 21st century will be “legacy boom years” for charities as the baby boomers born after the Second World War begin to die.New findings from the Legacy Giving 2050 project suggest this will contribute to an increase in total legacy income to £5.16 billion by the middle of the century. It is currently at just over £2.1 billion.The project – aimed at tracking the effect of baby boomers – says that deaths among this “charitably minded” generation, which accounts for 22 per cent of the UK’s population, will start to climb in 2020, peaking around 20 year later. It also says the percentage of the baby boomers who die childless will “climb steadily” from 2030.Building on similar projects in 2007 and 2010, Legacy Foresight, which produces the research, now predicts that, by 2050:The percentage of wills containing a charitable bequest will rise to 19 per cent from the current figure of 14.5 per centThe number of charitable bequests will double from 112,000 to 227,000Pecuniary gifts will rise more quickly than residuals (what’s left over avert all the pecuniary gifts have been disbursed) as “charities reach out to new groups of mid-wealth households”, accounting doe 58 per cent of charitable bequessts compared to the current figure of 55 per cent. Photo: legacy by marekuliasz on Shutterstock.com Legacy boom years predicted as baby boomers begin to die out  88 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis9last_img read more

National Garden Scheme to donate over £1m this year despite gardens closure

first_img The National Garden Scheme is committing in excess of £1 million to its beneficiary charities and to 44 community garden projects throughout England and Wales this year, despite the coronavirus outbreak meaning the closure of gardens.This includes new Community Gardens Award funding of £97,210, which is being distributed to 44 community gardening projects across England and Wales in memory of garden writer Elspeth Thompson. £165,000 of the total donation will also go to granting bursaries to support gardeners in a variety of training or apprentice schemes, or who find themselves in hard times.Its long-term charity beneficiaries include Hospice UK and Marie Curie.George Plumptre, CEO of the National Garden Scheme said:“The current climate of uncertainty and the loss for the foreseeable future of garden openings which provide 90% of our income, compounded by a poor start to the season with storms affecting many of the stunning snowdrop gardens, means that the National Garden Scheme has been unable to distribute as much as it would have liked to our beneficiary charities.“However, we are still donating in excess of £1 million to the majority of our nursing and health beneficiaries this spring and are delighted to be able to announce the tripling of funds to community gardens that make such a positive impact on the health and wellbeing of so many.”Over £58 million in total has been donated during the Scheme’s 93-year history.Over 800 new and returning gardens were due to open under the National Garden Scheme during 2020. One of the most distinguished gardens that planned to return, after 40 years, was Rousham in Oxfordshire where the ornamental 18th-century landscape overlooking the River Cherwell was designed by William Kent. There are also walled gardens with herbaceous borders a pigeon house and kitchen garden, and the park is home to a herd of Old English Longhorn cattle. With the gardens closed at least until June, the National Garden Scheme is encouraging people to donate via its site if possible.This year, the Year of the Tree, also sees the National Garden Scheme partnering with the Woodland Trust, to promote a wider understanding and appreciation of trees within both a wild and domestic garden setting. It will be showing the importance of trees, sharing the gardens in its portfolio that hold national collections or are home to historic or special trees and looking at their role in carbon capture and climate resilience.  468 total views,  2 views today Advertisement AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis2 Melanie May | 27 March 2020 | News National Garden Scheme to donate over £1m this year despite gardens closure Tagged with: Funding About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.  469 total views,  3 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis2last_img read more

Foreign journalists in Tripoli forbidden to leave their hotel

first_imgNews Help by sharing this information March 4, 2011 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Foreign journalists in Tripoli forbidden to leave their hotel RSF_en center_img Foreign journalists in Tripoli who wanted to cover the street protests taking place there were forbidden to leave their hotels unless they had permission. Security agents blocked attempts by reporters to leaving the Rixos Hotel (located to the south of the centre), which was being used to house many of the journalists who were invited by the government. Threatening to arrest all those who went out without permission, government spokesman Moussa Ibrahim said the presence of journalists on the street could provoke violence. Organisation last_img read more

RSF decries seven-year jail term of journalist Nazir Al-Majid

first_img Aged 40, Nazir Al-Majid is known in Saudi Arabia for expressing liberal philosophical views and for criticizing Shia religious doctrine and government policies in his published writings. He was convicted on a range of charges including disobeying the authorities, taking part in demonstrations in the Qatif region, criticizing the government in his writings (some dating back to 2007) and being in contact with the correspondents of such foreign media outlets as Reuters, AFP and CNN. Tried before the Specialised Criminal Court in Riyadh, which often handles terrorism cases, he was arrested immediately following the trial to begin serving the jail term and was given no time to warn his loved ones. “We condemn this journalist’s imprisonment because of his writings and his opinions,” said Alexandra El Khazen, the head of RSF’s Middle East desk. “He is guilty only of exercising his right to freedom of information and telling regional and international media about demonstrations in his region. We stress the importance of allowing a public debate in Saudi Arabia, and we urge the authorities to free him at once and to overturn this conviction.” According to RSF’s sources, Majid was not accompanied by a lawyer during his trial and his family has yet to get access to a copy of the court’s decision. He is currently being held in Riyadh’s Ha’ir prison. The charges on which he was convicted date back to 2011, when he was detained and spent a total of 15 months in pre-trial detention. He was arrested for the first time on 13 April 2011, shortly after posing an article online entitled, “I protest, therefore I am a human being.” According to a Human Rights Watch report and to the regional media, he was tortured while in detention and spent five months in solitary confinement. Majid has written for many Arabic-language newspapers including the pan-Arab daily Al-Hayat and the Saudi regional newspaper Al-Sharq. At least 11 journalists and citizen journalists are currently detained in Saudi Arabia, which is ranked 165th out of 180 countries in RSF’s 2016 World Press Freedom Index. Saudi ArabiaMiddle East – North Africa Condemning abusesProtecting journalists ImprisonedFreedom of expression Receive email alerts Help by sharing this information Saudi ArabiaMiddle East – North Africa Condemning abusesProtecting journalists ImprisonedFreedom of expression News © Arab 48 Saudi media silent on RSF complaint against MBS News News Organisation NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs saycenter_img Reporters Without Borders (RSF) calls for the immediate and unconditional release of Nazir Al-Majid, a Saudi intellectual and journalist held since 18 January, when a Riyadh court sentenced him to seven years in prison, a fine and a seven-year foreign travel ban on completion of the jail term. June 8, 2021 Find out more RSF joins Middle East and North Africa coalition to combat digital surveillance April 28, 2021 Find out more January 30, 2017 RSF decries seven-year jail term of journalist Nazir Al-Majid to go further Follow the news on Saudi Arabia News RSF_en March 9, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

Coronavirus updates: Disneyland to remain closed through end of year

first_imgSamara Heisz/iStockBy MORGAN WINSOR, EMILY SHAPIRO, IVAN PEREIRA and MEREDITH DELISO, ABC News(NEW YORK) — A pandemic of the novel coronavirus has now killed more than 1.2 million people worldwide.Over 52.3 million people across the globe have been diagnosed with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new respiratory virus, according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. The actual numbers are believed to be much higher due to testing shortages, many unreported cases and suspicions that some national governments are hiding or downplaying the scope of their outbreaks. The criteria for diagnosis — through clinical means or a lab test — has also varied from country to country.Since the first cases were detected in China in December, the virus has rapidly spread to every continent except Antarctica. The United States is the worst-affected nation, with more than 10.4 million diagnosed cases and at least 242,248 deaths.Nearly 200 vaccine candidates for COVID-19 are being tracked by the World Health Organization, at least 10 of which are in crucial phase three studies. Of those 10 potential vaccines in late-stage trials, there are currently five that will be available in the United States if approved.Here’s how the news developed Thursday. All times Eastern:Nov 12, 10:49 pmSt. Louis to limit private gatherings due to COVID spikeSt. Louis will ban all private gatherings with more than 10 people starting Saturday, the city’s mayor announced.“Over the last few weeks, especially after Halloween, it’s no secret we continue to see a resurgence of new #COVID19 cases and hospitalizations,” Mayor Lyda Krewson said in a Twitter post Thursday night announcing the limit. “In the City, contact tracing tells us transmission is primarily happening among friends, families, and neighbors via informal gatherings around homes and neighborhoods.”About half of new cases are people in their 20s and 30s, she added.The new order applies to any private social event or gathering, including house parties, dinner parties and celebrations. It also recommends that any private gathering include at most two households.The order, which will be in effect indefinitely, does not detail any penalties for violating the limit.The new restriction comes as the city’s positivity rate is over 10% and inpatient and intensive care unit beds in St. Louis Metropolitan Task Force Hospitals are at 90% or greater occupancy, the order noted.Nov 12, 9:48 pmCases reach another high amid record growthThe number of new COVID-19 cases hit another high on Thursday, as the country experiences record growth in cases, according to The COVID Tracking Project.There were 150,526 new cases reported on Thursday, according to the data tracker. The seven-day average stands at nearly 130,000 cases, which is a dramatic 71% increase from more than two weeks ago, it found.“Cases nationwide are trending up more quickly than at any point in the pandemic,” The COVID Tracking Project said.This week, 1 in every 378 U.S. residents tested positive for COVID-19, based on the tracker’s data.Current hospitalizations also hit a new high on Thursday, at 67,096. The death toll was 1,104.Nov 12, 7:48 pm52 states and territories in upward trajectory of new cases: HHSAn internal memo from Health and Human Services obtained by ABC News on Thursday night shows that 52 states and territories are in an upward trajectory of new COVID-19 cases. One jurisdiction is at a plateau, and two are in a downward trajectory, the memo said.Nationally, new cases confirmed between Nov. 5 and 11 increased 35.1% over the previous seven-day period, and deaths increased 30.5% in that time frame. The national test-positivity rate increased to 9.8% from 7.7% in week-to-week comparisons.Across the country, 28% of hospitals have more than 80% of their intensive care unit beds filled. That number was 17% to 18% of hospitals during the summertime peak.ABC News’ Josh Margolin contributed to this report.Nov 12, 7:46 pmIvy League cancels winter sports seasonThe Ivy League has canceled its winter sports season, officials from the Division I conference announced Tuesday.Competition for spring sports also has been postponed through at least the end of February 2021, the league said.Additionally, fall sports, which were canceled this semester, will not compete during the spring semester. The option had initially been seen as a possibility. “Regrettably, the current trends regarding transmission of the COVID-19 virus and subsequent protocols that must be put in place are impeding our strong desire to return to intercollegiate athletics competition in a safe manner,” the Ivy League Council of Presidents said in a statement.The league is the first to cancel its winter sports season, according to ESPN. The impacted sports include men’s and women’s basketball, wrestling, indoor track and field, swimming and fencing.Nov 12, 7:05 pmDon Young, oldest member of Congress, tests positiveAlaska Republican Rep. Don Young, who is the oldest member of Congress, has tested positive for the coronavirus, he announced Thursday.“I have tested positive for COVID-19,” he said on Twitter. I am feeling strong, following proper protocols, working from home in Alaska, and ask for privacy at this time. May God Bless Alaska.”The 87-year-old has served in Congress since 1973 — winning 24 terms in the state’s at-large seat.He was projected by The Associated Press to win reelection over Democrat Alyse Galvin last week. He is currently leading 57%-43% with 82% of precincts reporting.Nov 12, 6:39 pmCDC predicts COVID death toll to reach upward of 282K by Dec. 5In its latest forecast, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention predicted there could be as many as 282,000 COVID-19 deaths in the U.S. by Dec. 5. Its national ensemble forecast predicts that there will likely be 5,500 to 13,400 newly reported COVID-19 deaths in the week ending on Dec. 5, and 260,000 to 282,000 COVID-19 total deaths reported by this date.  As of Thursday evening, 242,557 people in the U.S. have died from the virus, according to Johns Hopkins University. The U.S. is on track to meet last week’s CDC prediction that at least a quarter of a million people will die from COVID-19 by the end of Thanksgiving weekend. ABC News’ Anne Flaherty contributed to this report.Nov 12, 6:26 pmDisneyland to remain closed at least through end of yearWhile Disney World in Orlando, Florida, has reopened with limitations, don’t expect to return to Southern California’s Disneyland anytime soon.On an earnings call Thursday, Disney said the park will remain closed at least through the end of the year. The tight COVID restrictions in California earned condemnation from Disney CEO Bob Chapek.“Unfortunately, we remain extremely disappointed that the State of California continues to keep Disneyland closed, despite our proven track record,” Chapek said in a statement. “We look forward to the time when all of our parks and ships are operating again and we’re able to create even more magical experiences for our guests.”California reported 6,927 new cases on Thursday as the state crept to 991,000 overall since the pandemic began. It will become just the second state, behind Texas, to cross 1 million cases. Orange County, where Disneyland is located, currently has a test-positivity rate of 3.7% — the highest percentage since Sept. 17.The Parks, Experiences and Products division, which also includes resorts and cruise lines, lost $2.4 billion in operating income in the last quarter, according to the report. The division also fell 61% in revenue last quarter.Disney World reopened in mid-July after being closed for nearly four months.Walt Disney is the parent company of ABC News.Nov 12, 3:53 pm1 in 378 Americans tested positive for COVID-19 this weekAcross the U.S., COVID-19 cases are up 41%, hospitalizations are up 20% and deaths are up 23%, according to the COVID Tracking Project’s weekly update.With 875,401 new cases, one in 378 Americans tested positive for COVID-19 this week, according to the COVID Tracking Project.Twenty-seven states this week hit a record for the number of new cases reported.The seven-day average of deaths now exceeds 1,000 per day, a level not seen since the summer. States reported another 7,382 lives lost to COVID-19 in the past week, according to the COVID Tracking Project.ABC News’ Brian Hartman contributed to this reportNov 12, 3:26 pmUtah positivity rate at 23.3%, cases ‘accelerating’In Utah, where the seven-day positivity rate stands at 23.2%, cases are “accelerating,” said Gov. Gary Herbert.“The positivity rate should cause us all concern,” Herbert said.The governor warned, “The rooms in intensive care units are getting to the point of being overcrowded.” Hospitals are at 87.5% capacity, said state epidemiologist Dr. Angela Dunn.Nov 12, 3:03 pmGeorgia secretary of state quarantining after wife tests positive Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger, a Republican who held a news conference Wednesday in the wake of the presidential election, is now self-quarantining after his wife tested positive for COVID-19, Raffensperger’s deputy, Jordan Fuchs, told ABC News.The secretary of state will be tested and results will be released.ABC News’ Quinn Scanlan contributed to this reportNov 12, 2:48 pmStay-at-home advisory to go into effect in Chicago due to ‘ongoing surge’A stay-at-home advisory will go into effect in Chicago on Monday morning “due to the alarming and ongoing surge in COVID-19 cases,” Mayor Lori Lightfoot announced Thursday.Lightfoot is asking residents to “stay home unless for essential reasons” and “stop having guests over—including family members you do not live with.”She’s urging residents to avoid nonessential travel, including canceling traditional Thanksgiving plans.“Our goal now is the same as it was during the first surge: bend the curve. The more we bend the curve, the more we can reopen our businesses and get our lives back to some sense of normalcy,” she tweeted.Nov 12, 2:38 pmHard-hit Ohio sets another daily case recordOhio has set another one-day record with 7,101 new COVID-19 cases.This also marked Ohio’s second-highest day of hospital admissions with 268 people admitted, Gov. Mike DeWine said Thursday.“We are currently at our highest point for both hospitalized and ICU patients since the beginning of the pandemic,” DeWine said.Over 274,000 people have been diagnosed and at least 5,658 people in the state have died.DeWine announced new restrictions on Wednesday, including that universities will be remote after Thanksgiving businesses must post mask requirement signs at their entrances.Nov 12, 1:49 pmGermany, Greece report record case increasesGermany’s Robert Koch Institut reported a record one-day increase of 21,866 new COVID-19 cases on Thursday, bringing Germany’s total to over 727,000 people diagnosed.Lothar Wieler, president of the RKI, warned, “it is possible that patients may no longer be able to receive optimal care.”Greece’s National Public Health Organization also reported a record increase in new cases and fatalities on Thursday. Greece has over 66,000 people diagnosed and at least 959 deaths.Italy’s Civil Protection Agency reported 37,978 new COVID-19 cases on Thursday, bringing the nation’s total to 1,066,401. There were 636 new fatalities, bringing Italy’s death toll to 43,589.ABC News’ Christine Theodorou contributed to this report.Nov 12, 1:16 pmCorey Lewandowski tests positiveTrump adviser Corey Lewandowski has tested positive for COVID-19, according to a person briefed on the diagnosis.Lewandowski tested positive for the virus on Wednesday. He has been in Philadelphia this week as the Trump campaign continues to bring lawsuits related to the election results.Lewandowski was among 400 attendees at an indoor election night party at the White House. Many attendees were not wearing masks or social distancing, including chief of staff Mark Meadows, who also tested positive in the days after the event.Jeff Miller, a lobbyist and longtime Republican political strategist, has also tested positive for the coronavirus, according to a person familiar with the diagnosis. Miller was also at the election night party at the White House.At least 15 people in President Donald Trump’s orbit have tested positive for COVID-19 since Meadows’ diagnosis last Wednesday.Richard Walters, the chief of staff for the Republican National Committee, has also tested positive for COVID-19, according to an RNC official.“The RNC is following CDC guidance and notifying staff who came in contact with him,” the official said.Walters has not been to the White House recently.ABC News’ Katherine Faulders contributed to this report.Nov 12, 12:19 pmNYC ‘preparing’ to close schools if positivity rate climbs over 3%New York City is “preparing” to temporarily close schools immediately if the citywide seven-day positivity rate climbs over 3%, Mayor Bill de Blasio said. The seven-day positivity now stands at 2.6%. While noting there is an “unbelievably low level of transmission in our schools,” the mayor nonetheless said the city “will move immediately, the next day schools will be shut down.” “No one wants to see that happen,” he said. “There is still a chance to turn that around. But we are preparing for that possibility.”ABC News’ Aaron Katersky contributed to this report.Nov 12, 12:18 pmCorey Lewandowski tests positiveTrump adviser Corey Lewandowski has tested positive for COVID-19, according to a person briefed on the diagnosis.Lewandowski tested positive for the virus on Wednesday. He has been in Philadelphia this week as the Trump campaign continues to bring lawsuits related to the election results.ABC News’ Katherine Faulders contributed to this report.Nov 12, 11:02 amNew tool shows COVID-19 risk anywhere in the US in real timeWorried about COVID-19 this Thanksgiving?You can calculate the risk level of being exposed to the virus while attending a gathering, given the event size and location, through a new tool developed by the Georgia Institute of Technology.The COVID-19 Event Risk Assessment Planning Tool is a free, interactive, peer-reviewed, online dashboard that estimates the risk that at least one individual infected with COVID-19 is present in gatherings of different sizes throughout the United States and, increasingly, around the globe.The tool allows users to adjust the size of the event and hover their cursor over a map of the United States to see the current risk level by county. For example, as of Thursday, there is a 93% chance of being exposed to COVID-19 at a dinner of 15 people in South Dakota’s virus-hit Dewey County.ABC News’ Anne Flaherty contributed to this report.Nov 12, 10:59 amNearly 550 people on Delta’s no-fly listNearly 550 people are on Delta’s no-fly list for not complying with the airline’s mask policy, company CEO Ed Bastion said in an internal memo to employees Thursday.“Fortunately, that number represents a tiny fraction of our overall customers, the vast majority of whom follow our guidelines,” he said.Bastion told employees, “Please continue to conduct a self-assessment every day for symptoms before coming into work and remember mask-wearing continues to be essential.”ABC News’ Amanda Maile contributed to this report.Nov 12, 9:30 amAfrica sees average 8% rise in new cases over past monthAfrica’s top public health official said the continent of 1.3 billion people has seen an average 8% rise in new COVID-19 cases over the past month.“We expected it to happen,” John Nkengasong, director of the Africa Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, told a virtual press conference Thursday, adding that when a second wave of the pandemic hits, “it seems to come back with a lot of full force.”More than 1.9 million cases of COVID-19 have been confirmed across Africa, including over 45,000 deaths. Although testing remains a challenge, the 54-nation continent is on track to surpass two million total cases within days as infections creep up in countries like the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Kenya and Nigeria.Nkengasong urged governments and citizens to follow public health measures.“We are at a critical point in the response,” he said.Nov 12, 7:39 amFauci tells Americans to ‘hang in there,’ ‘help is really on the way’As COVID-19 infections and hospitalizations soar to record rates across the United States, the nation’s top expert on infectious diseases is urging Americans to double down on fundamental public health measures and “hang in there” until a vaccine becomes widely available.“Help is really on the way,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, told ABC News’ Robin Roberts in an interview Thursday on Good Morning America.“The cavalry is coming here. Vaccines are going to have a major positive impact,” he added. “They’re going to start being implemented and deployed in December. And as we start getting into the early part of the year — it’s going to be January, February, March — more and more and more people are going to be able to be vaccinated. So if we could just hang in there, do the public health measures that we’re talking about, we’re going to get this under control — I promise you.”Those measures include wearing face masks, maintaining physical distances, avoiding crowds and washing hands as often as possible.“They sound very simple and, given the really very difficult challenge we’re facing, one might think that that doesn’t make any difference. It really does,” Fauci said.Fauci, a key member of the current White House coronavirus task force, said health care providers and those who are deemed most at-risk will have priority access to a COVID-19 vaccine, but that “ordinary” citizens should be able to get it in the second quarter of next year.With November on pace to be America’s worst month yet fighting the coronavirus pandemic, Fauci admitted he didn’t know whether the nation was headed for a lockdown but said “we would like to stay away from that.”“Hopefully we won’t have to do that,” he added. “The best opposite strategy to locking down is to intensify the public health measures short of locking down. So if you could do that well, you don’t have to take that step that people are trying to avoid, which has so many implications both psychologically and economically. We’d like not to do that.”When asked about the political limbo in the wake of the presidential election, Fauci said, “Certainly it’s having no impact negatively on our ability as well as our activity in developing vaccines and developing counter measures.”“It is still a major challenge,” he added. “We’re in a difficult situation and we just got to keep pushing.”Nov 12, 6:55 amBiden coronavirus advisor says US lockdown could control pandemicDr. Michael Osterholm, a coronavirus advisor to President-elect Joe Biden, said a nationwide lockdown could help bring the pandemic under control in the United States and even revive the economy.Osterholm floated the idea during an on-camera interview with Yahoo Finance on Wednesday, saying COVID-19 could be managed until a vaccine becomes available by shutting down businesses for four to six weeks and paying people for lost wages.“We could pay for a package right now to cover all of the wages, lost wages for individual workers, for losses to small companies, to medium-sized companies or city, state, county governments. We could do all of that,” Osterholm said. “If we did that, then we could lock down for four to six weeks.”He said such a scenario could drive down infections and hospitalizations, “like they did in New Zealand and Australia.”“Then we could really watch ourselves cruising into the vaccine availability in the first and second quarter of next year while bringing back the economy long before that,” he added.Osterholm, director of the Center of Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, was named a member of Biden’s transition COVID-19 advisory board on Monday. He previously served as a Science Envoy for Health Security on behalf of the U.S. Department of State from June 2018 to May 2019.During an exclusive interview with ABC News’ David Muir earlier this year, then-Democratic presidential nominee Biden said he “would listen to the scientists” if a nationwide lockdown was recommended.“I will be prepared to do whatever it takes to save lives because we cannot get the country moving until we control the virus,” Biden said.Nov 12, 5:52 amRussia sees record high deaths for second straight dayRussia registered 439 deaths from COVID-19 in the last 24 hours, setting a new single-day record for the second straight day.An additional 21,608 new cases of COVID-19 were also confirmed nationwide over the past day. Russia’s cumulative total now stands at 1,858,568 cases with 32,032 deaths, according to the country’s coronavirus response headquarters.Moscow remains the epicenter of the country’s outbreak and recent surge. Nearly 28% of the newly confirmed cases — 5,997 — and over 16% of the new deaths — 71 — were reported in the capital, according to Russia’s coronavirus response headquarters.Despite the growing number of infections and deaths, Russian authorities have repeatedly said they have no plans to impose another nationwide lockdown.The Eastern European country of 145 million people has the fifth-highest tally of COVID-19 cases in the world, behind only the United States, India, Brazil and France, according to a real-time count kept by Johns Hopkins University.Nov 12, 5:01 amSeven dead, 140 others sick in outbreak at Illinois veterans homeA COVID-19 outbreak at a veterans home in Illinois has left seven people dead and more than 140 others infected, according to a report by Chicago ABC station WLS-TV.Currently, there are 72 residents and 72 employees battling the virus at the Illinois Veterans Home in LaSalle, some 100 miles southwest of Chicago. Four people died this week alone, WLS reported.The facility has been conducting health screenings of staff and residents, maintaining social distancing practices, wearing face coverings as well as intensifying cleaning and disinfecting protocols, according to WLS.“How did this happen so quickly if these protocols are in place?” state Rep. Stephanie Kifowit, a veteran herself who chairs the Veterans Affairs Committee in the Illinois House of Representatives, told WLS. “We need to take care of our veterans. They served us and we need to to serve them and make sure they are safe and they are in safe environment.”Illinois Gov. J.B. Pritzker said it’s challenging to stop the virus from getting into veterans homes and other care facilities.“Our veterans homes really have done an outstanding job of keep our veterans safe,” Pritzker said at a ribbon-cutting ceremony for a long-delayed state veterans home in Chicago on Wednesday morning. “But you can’t 100% keep everybody safe in this environment, especially when our communities, our mayors, our city councils, our county chairs aren’t living up to the mitigations, are not enforcing the mitigations in many parts of the state.”“No matter what we do, there is a level of risk,” he added, “and it is especially risky, frankly, for those who are seniors, people who are over 60. As the age goes up, so does the risk.”Nov 12, 4:22 amUS reports nearly 2,000 new deathsThere were 1,984 fatalities from COVID-19 registered in the United States on Wednesday, according to a real-time count kept by Johns Hopkins University.The latest daily death toll is the highest figure since early May but still under the country’s peak of 2,609 new deaths on April 15.An additional 144,133 cases of COVID-19 were also identified nationwide on Wednesday, marking a new single-day record.It’s the eighth day in a row that the country has reported over 100,000 new infections. Wednesday’s tally tops the nation’s previous all-time high of 136,325 new cases recorded a day earlier.A total of 10,257,825 people in the United States have been diagnosed with COVID-19 since the pandemic began, and at least 239,683 of them have died, according to Johns Hopkins. The cases include people from all 50 U.S. states, Washington, D.C. and other U.S. territories as well as repatriated citizens.Much of the country was under lockdown by the end of March as the first wave of pandemic hit. By May 20, all U.S. states had begun lifting stay-at-home orders and other restrictions put in place to curb the spread of the novel coronavirus. The day-to-day increase in the country’s cases then hovered around 20,000 for a couple of weeks before shooting back up and crossing 100,000 for the first time on Nov. 4.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more