Can You Name Every Grateful Dead Original? Take This Quiz And Find Out

first_imgWith a historic thirty-year career and countless ongoing iterations, there’s just no stopping the spirit of the Grateful Dead. Today’s announcement of an indie-rock, 59-track tribute album to the group all but cements their position in rock and roll lore, leading the pack and godfathering the jam scene as we know and love it today.Throughout their long career, the Grateful Dead debuted a total of 154 original songs (not to mention all of their covers). Just a few weeks ago, one database-loving Deadhead created the ultimate playlist featuring the debut version of every single original. With the help of that playlist, we wanted our fans to put their Grateful knowledge to the test.Check out this Sporcle quiz below, featuring the debut performance of each original song. Can you name them all? Good luck! While we discouraging cheating, we do encourage Grateful Dead listening. Check out the playlist here!last_img read more

A teaching treasure trove

first_imgWhen Harvard history professor Dan Smail wanted to bring the Middle Ages to life, he turned to the Harvard Art Museums to help his students touch the past.In the fall, Smail introduced the General Education course “Culture and Belief 51” to undergraduates, and for the first time used items in Harvard’s vast collections to offer his students an intimate look at the period.“What we really wanted to do was get the students kind of behind the scenes … to touch and handle things and engage with them in a way that they could do much, much better in person than they could just standing in a gallery,” said Smail.The class made a field trip to a seminar room in the museums’ Somerville facility to pore over items that included a late fifth century pilgrim’s flask used for carrying holy water. Back in Cambridge, the students visited the Arthur M. Sackler Museum, where they inspected the head of a statue of a medieval king.The object-driven nature of the course, said Smail, “gave everything a kind of tangibility” and led to “incredibly bubbling, flourishing conversations.” He said his students couldn’t get enough of the experience. “They loved everything about it. It got the highest evaluation of any course I’ve ever taught.”Harvard is at the forefront of a burgeoning movement to help students, faculty, and the public better understand and engage with myriad fields, from fine art to physics to philosophy, by encouraging the close examination of material things, like the great works of art and ephemera contained in its rich and robust collections.When the Harvard Art Museums, made up of the Fogg Museum, the Busch-Reisinger Museum, and the Arthur M. Sackler Museum, opens in fall 2014 in its renovated and expanded home at 32 Quincy St., a vastly expanded art study center and a series of new teaching galleries will drive that mission forward.As part of the renovation project’s final phase, the Sackler galleries, which have remained open since the renovation began, will close on June 1. Those spaces will be needed to prepare for the packing and moving of the museums’ collections into the new galleries.A central feature of the updated facility is an enhanced and expanded art study center that will make thousands of little-seen works from the Fogg, Busch-Reisinger, and Sackler museums available for hands-on study. Occupying most of the fourth floor, the center will include three study rooms, two seminar rooms that can accommodate smaller groups of students, and a large reception area.Officials from the museums worked closely with members of Harvard’s Project Zero at the Harvard Graduate School of Education (HGSE) on a vision for the new center, one based on extensive feedback and research, including interviews with the museums’ staff, observations and interviews in the previous museum study centers, and interviews with faculty from Harvard and beyond.The results, said Thomas W. Lentz, Elizabeth and John Moors Cabot Director of the Harvard Art Museums, prove that the study center experience not only offers visitors a way to engage with art, but also acts as a driver of innovation.“We know from experience, and from a number of studies we conducted, that in a study center people tend to look differently, they linger, and they look more deeply,” said Lentz. “The study center is one of the powerful engines of this new facility because it will create new kinds of teaching and learning experiences and foster collaborations and connections across different fields and disciplines at Harvard.”Other new features that are intended to invite visitors to look more deeply and to foster fresh areas of inquiry and cross-disciplinary connections include three teaching galleries on the third floor. The galleries, which will be open to the public, will devote 3,000 square feet to support student coursework, curatorial studies, and the work of the new art study center.In imagining these gallery spaces, “We wanted to think about physical parts of our facility that had been very effective for us in the past and bring those things forward and think anew about some exciting kinds of spaces,” said Debi Kao, chief curator of the museums.As part of the new configuration, one gallery, as it was in the past, will be dedicated to the course goals of Harvard’s History of Art and Architecture program. The second gallery will link directly to the mission of the new art study center and will offer faculty and students a space in which to study and linger over particular works of art. The third gallery will act as a type of curatorial laboratory where students can study in close detail the “art of installation,” developing their own exhibitions and learning how to “visualize” an argument with works of art.“This is a space where curators can work with faculty and students to essentially teach them how constructing an argument with real objects in real space is very different than constructing an argument with words on paper, and yet they are equally powerful,” said Kao. “All those choices of juxtapositions, whether two works are right next to each other or across the room, change how any person is going to interpret the visual thing.”One person familiar with the transformative nature of working directly with art objects is Jennifer Roberts, a professor of history of art and architecture. Last year Roberts developed a course that led to a student-curated show on contemporary master Jasper Johns that was displayed at the Sackler.“One of the first lessons that you need to teach in art history is that looking in a textbook is very, very different from looking at the actual object,” said Roberts, who often has her students look at a work of art on a computer screen before seeing the original in a gallery. “For many of them, the entire meaning or their interpretation of the image changes completely when they see the real thing.”Working with students to help them develop and curate the Johns show “involved a totally different kind of thinking and a different way of articulating ideas. I think that type of experience will be really exciting and productive for future generations of students,” said Roberts.But the new galleries and art study center are just part of the vision for the facility. In planning the renovation, museum officials arranged works to ensure that each newly configured space could accommodate a faculty member and a cohort of 15 students.“It’s our hope,” said Kao, “that every installed space can be used for teaching and learning and new discoveries.”last_img read more

Metsger urges ‘blanket’ PAL exemption from payday rule

first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr NCUA Board Chairman Rick Metsger on Wednesday called on CFPB to give credit unions a “blanket exemption for payday alternative loans,” or PALs, in its payday lending rule. NAFCU has been advocating this exemption due to provisions in the rule that would increase the regulatory burden on credit unions.“NAFCU appreciates Chairman Rick Metsger and Board Member J. Mark McWatters’ support of credit unions and their responsible lending practices, and we thank Chairman Metsger for reaching out to CFPB to avoid regulation that would surely hamstring credit unions’ efforts to lend,” said NAFCU Director of Regulatory Affairs Alexander Monterrubio. “Credit unions cannot be expected to offer their members the same excellent products and services while also facing inconsistent regulation from multiple regulators. CFPB must provide an explicit exemption for credit unions in the final rule in order to avoid punishing good actors along with bad.”In June, CFPB proposed a 1,300-page payday lending proposal that included a partial carve-out for PALs but did not completely exempt credit unions. In a letter from Metsger, NCUA urged the bureau to go further.“We respectfully request the Bureau exempt FCUs completely from its final rule for loans made under and consistent with NCUA’s PALs regulation,” Metsger wrote. “While the proposed rule included a conditional exemption for PALs compliant loans, it would nevertheless increase compliance burdens for credit unions and potentially divest NCUA of the flexibility to adjust its rule as it sees fit to reflect the unique characteristics of credit unions.” continue reading »last_img read more

Lost cell phone? Here’s how to keep your finances safe

first_imgWe depend on our cell phone for so many day-to-day tasks that go beyond communication. We keep track of our appointments, monitor our healthy lifestyle, and stay updated on breaking news. Additionally, our cell phones have become a hub for managing our finances.The Federal Reserve reports that Americans use their smart phones or other mobile devices for a variety of monetary activities. Financial apps have made it faster and easier than ever to access your money on the go and view all your financial information right from the palm of your hand.  But, what dangers could arise if you are one of the 5.2 million people who, in a year’s time, lose their smart phone or have their smart phones stolen? How can you protect your finances in the event that your cell phone ever goes missing?Take Action Right NowBefore your phone is ever compromised, take these precautions to prevent strangers from accessing your phone or the programs and apps it holds.Passcode Protection: 62% of smartphone owners don’t have a passcode set to protect their phone. You should always set your phone or mobile device to lock when it’s not in use and set a secure passcode or password for access to your phone. Some smartphones now let you take security even further and utilize your thumbprint or facial recognition to unlock your phone.Activate Find My Phone: The Find My Phone feature on your smartphone allows you to quickly trace your phone’s location if it ends up missing. Your operating systems may also offer a Lost Mode. With this feature, you can send a message to your home screen asking anyone who finds your phone to call to you at a specified number.If Your Smartphone is LostQuick action can be the difference between saving your financial information or months of headache if your accounts are accessed by a stranger. Take these actions as soon as you realize your phone is gone.Contact Your Financial Institution: Let your credit union, credit card company, and lenders know your phone or device is missing and someone may have access to your account information. They can flag your account as “compromised,” freeze your accounts, or monitor suspicious activity.Change Your Passwords: Use your desktop computer or another mobile device to reset the passwords for your online banking or payment tools. Also reset your email password. This way if someone uses the “Forgot My Password” feature on any financial app or website, they cannot access your email and reset your passwords themselves.A Final Tip: Always log out of financial websites or apps before you close out of them. Keeping yourself logged in or enabling auto sign-in means that your information is easily accessible, even if you’re not the one holding your device. 51SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Kara Vincent Kara Vincent is a Finance Officer at Lancaster Red Rose Credit Union. With over 15 years in the financial services industry, Kara provides an integral role in serving the needs … Web: https://www.lrrcu.org Detailscenter_img 51% of smartphone users had used mobile banking.24% of smartphone users had made a mobile payment.38% of mobile phone users had deposited a check using their phone.last_img read more

Two Virus Stories – The New York Times

first_imgLast year, The Times’s book critics released a list of the 50 best memoirs of any kind over the past 50 years, including those by Gore Vidal and Maxine Hong Kingston.Not his first book. Obama, like Theodore Roosevelt and John F. Kennedy, is on the short list of presidents who were published authors before they were well-known politicians. Obama’s two earlier books, “Dreams From My Father” and “The Audacity of Hope,” were both best sellers, although the first one became a best seller only after his star turn as a speaker at the 2004 Democratic convention.PLAY, WATCH, EATWhat to Cook Even before any vaccine becomes widely available, virus treatment is already improving, thanks to earlier diagnoses and drugs like dexamethasone and remdesivir. The Food and Drug Administration granted emergency authorization yesterday to an Eli Lilly treatment that doctors recently gave to Chris Christie, the former New Jersey governor.The improving quality of treatments is evident in the death rate: Only about 1.5 percent of diagnosed cases have been fatal in recent weeks, compared with 1.7 percent in late July and early August, and 7 percent during the virus’s initial surge in the early spring. Want to get The Morning by email? Here’s the sign-up.Good morning. There’s good news on a vaccine, but the next few months of the pandemic will be difficult. No matter what, though, much of the world will probably be coping with severe outbreaks — and thousands more deaths each day — for months to come. The second story is much more encouraging. It’s the rapid progress that medical researchers are making on both potential vaccines and treatments that can ameliorate the virus’s worst symptoms.Pfizer announced yesterday that early data showed its vaccine prevented Covid-19 in more than 90 percent of trial volunteers. Other companies, including Moderna and Novavax have also reported encouraging news about their vaccines. (The Times’s Carl Zimmer and Katie Thomas answer some common vaccine questions here.)- Advertisement – Utah will require all residents to wear a mask, as its hospitals are near crisis levels. The first story is grim: Worldwide, the virus is spreading more rapidly than at any other point. The U.S. and Europe are both setting records for new confirmed cases, while South America, North Africa, India and other regions are coping with serious outbreaks.The spread is bad enough that harsh measures — like again shutting some restaurants or banning indoor gatherings — may be necessary to get it under control. Much of Europe has taken such steps in recent weeks. President Trump has opposed them. But President-elect Joe Biden, in appointing a 13-member virus task force yesterday, emphasized that he would take a radically different approach and base his policy on scientists’ advice.“These are some of the smartest people in infectious diseases,” my colleague Apoorva Mandavilli, a science reporter, said about the task force’s members. Biden, who has worn a mask in public for months, may also be able to increase mask-wearing by delivering a more consistent message about it than Trump has, Apoorva added. Yesterday, Biden implored Americans to wear masks, saying: “Do it for yourself. Do it for your neighbor.”- Advertisement – The full picture, via Ashish Jha, dean of Brown University’s public health school: “We all need to keep two seemingly contradictory facts in mind: 1. We are entering the hardest days of the pandemic. The next two months will see a lot of infections and deaths; 2. There is a light at the end of the tunnel. Today, that light got a bit brighter.”THE LATEST NEWSMore on the Virus A new Obama memoirThe first volume of Barack Obama’s presidential memoir, “A Promised Land,” will be published next week. To get you ready for the attention it will receive, we have prepared a short guide to memoirs, presidential and otherwise.Can Mr. match, or outdo, Mrs.? The top-selling print memoir in the U.S. is “Eat, Pray, Love” by Elizabeth Gilbert, according to the NPD Group, which began tracking the data in 2004. No. 2 on the list is “Becoming,” by Michelle Obama (which, of course, has been available for fewer years than “Eat, Pray, Love.”)Analysts expect “A Promised Land” to rise to near the top of the list, too. The book’s publisher, Penguin Random House, ordered a first U.S. printing of three million copies — about one million of which have to be printed in Germany because of a lack of printing capacity in the U.S.The top 10 list for memoirs also includes: “Between the World and Me” by Ta-Nehisi Coates; “The Magnolia Story” by the former HGTV stars Chip and Joanna Gaines; and “Wild” by Cheryl Strayed.What will the critics say? Many presidential memoirs are panned or receive mixed reviews, partly because ex-presidents are often unwilling to be fully honest about their disappointments, grudges and more. Two exceptions — considered among the best memoirs by presidents — are by Thomas Jefferson and Ulysses S. Grant, as Allen Barra explains in The Daily Beast. Mayor Bill de Blasio warned that New York City was “getting dangerously close” to a second wave, and the governor of New Jersey announced new restrictions on indoor dining. The rate of spread in the region had been very low for months. The pangram from yesterday’s Spelling Bee was beatific. Today’s puzzle is above — or you can play online if you have a Games subscription. An epic drum battle: Nandi Bushell, a British 10-year-old, found an audience with her impressive drum performances on YouTube. But it was her challenge to the Foo Fighters frontman Dave Grohl that propelled her to stardom.From Opinion: The Supreme Court hears arguments today in a lawsuit that seeks to overturn the Affordable Care Act. Abbe Gluck, a Yale law professor, argues that the case is a test of whether the court is willing to leave political decisions to the elected branches of government.Lives Lived: During World War II, Viola Smith wrote an essay asking, “Why not let the girls play in the big bands?” Her plea went unheeded, but she later performed at President Harry Truman’s inauguration. She died at 107. As these charts show, U.S. deaths have stayed in a narrow range — albeit at a terribly high level — even though cases have been surging since September: At least three people who attended an election party at the White House last week have tested positive for the virus, including Ben Carson, Trump’s housing secretary, and David Bossie, who is leading the effort to challenge election results. The Election There are two very different coronavirus stories happening now.- Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

Wednesday people roundup

first_imgATP, USS, IMI Pension Fund, NEST, HSBC Global Asset Management, Barings, CAMRADATA, Natixis, Omni Partners/CBFL, Franklin Templeton, Schroders, Generali Investments Europe, JP Morgan Asset ManagementATP – Bo Foged has been appointed group finance director at Danish pension fund ATP, replacing Lars Damgaard Sørensen, who left ATP earlier this month. Foged comes to ATP from the role of managing director at BankInvest Group, which he occupied since 2011. Before that, he was CFO at the asset manager from January 2009, having been CFO at Carnegie Bank prior to that. No date has been set for Foged’s start at ATP.USS – Kirsten English is joining the trustee board of the Universities Superannuation Scheme (USS) as a new independent director. Most recently, English worked as a consultant to private equity firms focusing on financial technology and portfolio company operational improvement. She previously worked at Reuters for 16 years. English is replacing John Bull, who stepped down at the end of March after 10 years as an independent non-executive director on USS’s trustee board. Bull was deputy chairman of the trustee board, a role that will now be filled by Kevin Carter.IMI Pension Fund – Greg Croyden has retired from his position as director of group pensions for IMI, the engineering firm, as well as his role as a company-nominated trustee and member of the investment committee. Croyden had been at IMI for more than 18 years, and was in his last role for just over a year. He was a trustee for the £1.2bn (€1.5bn) pension fund since 2006.  NEST – Tom Boardman has been named deputy chairman at the National Employment Savings Trust (NEST) Corporation. He has been a trustee member of NEST since 2010 and is a member of the trust’s audit and investment sub-committees. Previous roles in the pensions and insurance industry include director of retirement strategy and innovation at Prudential UK. Graham Berville has been appointed as a new trustee member of NEST. Both appointments will start on 1 June. Berville was chief executive of the Police Mutual Assurance Society until 2008 and is currently a trustee of Yorkshire Cancer Research. HSBC Global Asset Management – Ernst Osiander has been appointed head of the global bond team in London. As part of the new role, he will also join the firm’s global fixed income management group. Osiander joined HSBC two years ago. Before that, he worked for FMS Wertmanagement, focusing on sovereign credit risk. Osiander reports to Xavier Baraton, global CIO of fixed income, and takes over from Guy Dunham, who left the firm for Barings.Barings – Guy Dunham has been hired by Baring Asset Management (Barings) as head of global & aggregate. He will take responsibility for managing a range of global and aggregate portfolios for institutional clients, as well as being involved in managing global pooled bond funds. Dunham will be based in London. CAMRADATA – John Buttress is joining analysis provider CAMRADATA as a specialist adviser to oversee its business in evaluating ESG risks for investors, investment consultants and asset managers. Buttress has previously worked at Royal Sun Alliance and Allianz. Natixis – Ian Burn has been appointed global head of cash equity at Natixis, within its wholesale banking division. Burn will be based in London and report to Luc François, head of global markets at Natixis. He was previously at MainFirst Bank, and ING before that. Omni Partners/CBFL – John Jenkins has been hired as chief executive of CBFL, the captive origination platform for Omni Partners’ lending business and the Omni Secured Lending Fund. He comes to CBFL from GE Capital, where he was chief executive for eight years.Franklin Templeton – Kelsey Biggers has been named as the new head of performance analysis and investment risk (PAIR) at Franklin Templeton. He will oversee the global PAIR team, which comprises more than 100 staff across 19 locations. Biggers was previously head of risk at Franklin Templeton subsidiary K2 Advisors. He will report to Mat Gulley, executive vice-president and head of investment management strategic services for Franklin Templeton Investments. Schroders – Marc Mayer has been hired as head of institutional for North America at Schroders. Mayer comes to Schroders from a role as chief executive at GMO. Before that, he worked at AllianceBernstein for 20 years in various leadership roles. Geoff Cheetham has been appointed head of UK institutional clients at Schroders. He comes to the firm from Blackrock, where he was most recently head of EMEA consultants. Cheetham will report to Miles O’Connor, head of European institutional. Generali Investments Europe – Andrea Favaloro has been appointed head of sales and marketing at the asset management arm of Italy’s Generali Group. He was previously global head of external distribution at BNP Paribas Investment Partners. Antonio Cavarero is also joining as the new head of fixed income Italy. He comes to the company from Deutsche Bank in London, where he was senior inflation trader. Fabio Cleva has also been hired as deputy head of fixed income Italy, supporting Caverero. He joined the Generali Group in 2003 as fixed income manager. JP Morgan Asset Management – Andy Seed has been appointed to lead client relationships for the UK defined contribution (DC) business. He will report to Simon Chinnery, head of UK DC, and be based in London. Seed was previously a director for KPMG DC Solutions, and before that worked at Deloitte and Mercer.last_img read more

Man Takes Life Near Versailles Firehouse

first_imgAuthorities responded to the shooting death of a man who apparently took his own life near the Versailles Fire Department.Emergency personnel were called to the scene around 2:15 p.m. Sunday.First responders confirmed the man suffered a fatal self-inflicted gunshot wound. Officers say there was a firearm near the body which was in the parking lot of the firehouse.last_img

Wisconsin forward Joe Krabbenhoft records 6 steals to lead defense in victory

first_imgWith Wisconsin’s 55-50 victory Saturday night against the Ohio State Buckeyes, the Badgers have moved right into the thick of the NCAA Tournament race after winning their fourth-straight game.Their success Saturday night could not have come without the help of senior forward Joe Krabbenhoft.On the night, Krabbenhoft finished with nine points, eight rebounds, six steals and four assists. While he only went 2-for-4 from the field, he was 4-for-4 from the free-throw line, including hitting two at the end of the game, which helped cement the Badgers’ victory.“I love Krabbenhoft’s game,” Ohio State head coach Thad Matta said. “He has gotten savvy. He understands everything that is going on. He made some great reads both offensively and defensively. He took the ball up and knocked the three down there. The best I think he does is (being) the passer. Tonight, he gets six steals, and that’s what guys like that are supposed to do for you.”Krabbenhoft not only had a good statistical game but also hit shots when the Badgers needed them most. Down 48-47 with 2:06 left to go in the game, Krabbenhoft hit his only three of the game to put the Badgers up 50-48. Previous to that shot, a Jon Leuer jumper from the free-throw line was the only field goal the Badgers made in the last 6:41.“Well, how many big shots have I really made?” Krabbenhoft said. “That was a big shot. The shot clock was down, and I had to put it up. There were guys in there in rebounding position, so it wasn’t a bad shot.”Defensively, it was Krabbenhoft’s job to defend Ohio State guard Evan Turner, who entered the game averaging 17 points per contest, which ranks third in the Big Ten. He also averages 7.5 rebounds per game, which is third in the conference as well.“Evan Turner does a lot of different things,” Krabbenhoft said. “He goes to the post, he can ying-yang out on the perimeter.”While Turner did put up 23 points, Krabbenhoft also forced him to commit six turnovers and go 9-of-13 from the field without a 3-point attempt. While he played good defense, Krabbenhoft gave credit to his big men to help him defend Turner.“He was 9-for-13 and distributed the ball well, but we forced him into some things that he probably didn’t like so much,” Krabbenhoft said. “You have to give credit to the guys for helping me out.”Despite Krabbenhoft’s solid statistics, he had one error when he had a wide-open shot with the shot clock winding down but decided to bring it back out to the top of the key instead.“You know, I’d give him a 98 (percent),” Wisconsin head coach Bo Ryan said. “I would deduct two points for not knowing the amount of seconds on the shot clock, but he did OK. I’m not trading him. I don’t know if I have ever yelled ‘shoot’ louder in all my life, and I didn’t yell even when my kids played basketball. I always wanted them to play good defense.”Over the course of the four-game winning streak, Krabbenhoft has played exceptionally well, averaging 10.5 points and 6.5 rebounds per game while playing strong on the defensive end of the court.“Joe is always the type of guy who delivers,” Wisconsin forward Marcus Landry said. “You can always count on him. We put him on Evan Turner today and he did a great job of forcing him into some shots he wouldn’t normally take. Joe has been that type of guy ever since he’s been here. He’s the type of guy you want on your team. He’s a winner.”last_img read more

Former SU linebacker Dyshawn Davis signs with Washington Redskins after going undrafted

first_imgDavis missed just one game for the Orange in 2014, finishing second on the team with a career-high 71 tackles. His career-high three forced fumbles and seven quarterback hurries led SU.AdvertisementThis is placeholder textDavis was a three-year starter for Syracuse, but was not projected to be drafted, according to CBS Sports. He was ranked as the 538th overall player and 42nd outside linebacker in the draft as of late Thursday afternoon.After SU’s Pro Day on April 7, Davis said he is willing to play strong safety in the NFL.Davis is the fourth former Syracuse player to sign as an undrafted free agent after SU had no players selected in an NFL Draft for the first time since 2008. Offensive tackle Sean Hickey signed with the New Orleans Saints, defensive tackle Eric Crume signed with the Jacksonville Jaguars and Durell Eskridge signed with the New York Jets. Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Former Syracuse outside linebacker Dyshawn Davis signed with the Washington Redskins after not being picked in the NFL Draft, he announced in an Instagram post.center_img Published on May 2, 2015 at 9:23 pm Contact Jon: [email protected] | @jmettuslast_img read more

250 Tyndall victims come forward, ask USC to break silence

first_imgAttorney John Manly, who represents several women who have filed complaints against former gynecologist George Tyndall, spoke at a press conference Thursday. (Sasha Urban | Daily Trojan)Attorneys representing more than 250 victims of former USC gynecologist George Tyndall held a press conference Thursday at the Radisson Hotel, after filing 93 additional lawsuits against the University. More than 15 of Tyndall’s accusers attended, calling on California Attorney General Xavier Becerra to investigate the University. The U.S. Department of Education opened a Title IX investigation into the University’s handling of allegations of abuse against Tyndall in June. The lawsuits allege that USC ignored complaints about Tyndall and knowingly concealed his actions throughout his time at the Engemann Student Health Center.John Manly and Andy Rubenstein, the attorneys representing the accusers, were present at the conference. Rachael Denhollander and Sarah Klein, who were victims of former sports physician Larry Nassar’s sexual abuse at Michigan State University, also voiced their support for a state investigation. “To the Attorney General of California, do it better this time,” Denhollander said. “Open an independent investigation into what went on at USC even faster than the attorney general in Michigan did.” Eleven women spoke about their experiences with Tyndall, and many testified that Tyndall photographed them naked in his office. “I couldn’t believe it when I found out that the LAPD has boxes of photos of our vaginas,” said Audrey Nafziger, a graduate of the Gould School of Law. “It’s absolutely disgusting, and it’s absolutely what a predator does. [Tyndall] keeps trophies.” One victim, who introduced herself as Sarah,  said she called to find out if the University was holding those photos. She said the experience was “chilling and shocking.”“To this day, they’ve never followed up on my inquiry,” Sarah said. The women and their attorneys also called on USC to break its silence and listen to the nearly 500 accusers. “USC is treating these women as their adversary …” Manly said.  “These women are not your adversaries, they’re your best friends. It’s like they came home to their mother and tried to tell her about their abuse, and their mother shut the door in their face and threw rocks to get them off the lawn.” Dana Loewy, a former USC student and victim, said she wants the Board of Trustees to change, and that she thinks it is ridiculous the members of its executive committee are kept a secret. “When, USC, are you going to respond?” said Brennan Heil, a senior majoring in communication. “When are you going to start setting an example for every other university in the country, who I almost guarantee you has the same exact issue?”Many women spoke about how proud they are to be Trojans, and how excited they were to come to USC as young women. Shernae Hughes, who graduated last May, said she was elated to be the first in her family to attend college, especially one that promised diversity and a commitment to its students’ well-being. But the reality she discovered was very different. Hughes said Tyndall made numerous racist and sexist remarks to her about black women’s fertility and sexuality.“I am well aware of the interlocking oppressions of racism and sexism, and it is unfortunate that I have had to experience these effects as a student at the university that I called home,” Hughes said.Manly said the survivors are calling on Becerra to launch an independent investigation because the University receives taxpayer money. He said that USC’s independent  investigation under O’Melveny & Myers LLP, a law firm retained by Chairman Rick Caruso, is insufficient. “I know who I am as a woman, as a mother, so I am all in to see this through and to tell my story, despite what anyone may say,” said alumna Amanda Davis. “I am hopeful that USC knows what’s at stake here.”last_img read more