Residential school survivors descendents show poorer health outcomes survey

first_imgMia RabsonThe Canadian PressOTTAWA – The impacts of residential schools on the health and well-being of First Nations people are similar, whether they attended the schools themselves or are descended from someone who did, a new survey suggests.The finding comes from the third regional health survey by the First Nations Information Governance Centre, a non-profit organization with a mandate from the Assembly of First Nations. The centre has conducted the only comprehensive survey done in Canada of the health and socio-economic conditions on reserves.The first volume being made public today looks at physical and mental health, employment and income, housing and residential school experiences.On the latter it found the number of former residential school students still living is dwindling, but the impacts of the schools continue for the students’ children and grandchildren.Jonathan Dewar, executive director of the centre that produced the survey, said this is in keeping with similar research over the last 15 years.“Our studies indicate the impact of intergenerational survivors of residential schools were similar, sometimes identical to residential school survivors,” he said.About 15 per cent of adults who live on a reserve in Canada said they had attended a residential school. That number was 20 per cent in the first two surveys released in 2003 and 2010. Nearly two in three of those who attended said the schools had negatively impacted their health and well being.More than four in 10 adults who attended a residential school say they were sexually abused and seven in 10 say they were physically and verbally abused.About one-tenth reported the schools had a positive impact while about one-quarter said it had no impact, good or bad.The survey found former students or children of former students were less likely to say they were in good or excellent health compared with those who were not touched by the schools.Residential school survivors and those whose parents or grandparents attended were more likely to have considered suicide at some time in their life and had higher rates of binge drinking and drug use, including marijuana and opioids. For example, one in four teenagers on reserve who had a parent who attended a residential school had considered suicide, compared with one in 10 teenagers who didn’t have a parent or grandparent attend.Dewar says the survey does show some bright spots of improvement for the health and social well-being of people living on reserves though he cautions there needs to be more research done to explain why that may be.“It’s definitely showing signs of progress,” he said. “It still says there is more work that needs to be done. We need to dig deeper to know what interventions have worked.”In many cases where indicators have improved, First Nations still show significant differences from the general population in areas such as income and education, he noted.The number of adults who haven’t finished high school fell to 35 per cent from 40 per cent between 2010 and 2017. Youth smoking rates were cut in half, with one in 10 teenagers smoking regularly in the most recent survey compared to one in five seven years earlier. The prevalence of fetal alcohol syndrome was reduced among children living on reserves and the number of mothers who reported smoking during pregnancy fell to about one-third from nearly half.Almost 75 per cent of youth said they abstained from alcohol, up from 61 per cent seven years ago.On the flip side, some indicators got worse, particularly overcrowded housing. About 24 per cent of adults were living in a house considered to be overcrowded, up from 17 per cent in 2002. A house is deemed overcrowded if there is more than one person per room in the home.More than two-thirds of First Nations people living on reserve are in the labour force, either working or looking for work, which is slightly higher than the Canadian population as a whole. However almost one-third of First Nations adults on reserve are unemployed, compared with less than one-tenth of the general population.Fifteen per cent of the people who are not participating in the labour force said there was simply no work to be found in their community or that they had given up looking. Another 18 per cent said they could not work because of a health issue or disability.The survey is based on responses from more than 24,000 people living on reserve in 253 First Nations across Canada and was conducted between 2015 and 2017. The next volume of the report will focus on language and culture and will be released in July.last_img read more

Ratan Tata invests in baby care products retailer FirstCry

first_imgRatan Tata, chairman emeritus of Tata Sons, has invested an undisclosed sum in baby care products retailer FirstCry, marking his fourth investment in a start-up in 2016.His earlier investments in the current year were in technology and data provider Tracxn Technologies, pet dog care portal DogSpot, founded by Rana Atheya, and cashback and coupon portal CashKaro, co-founded by Swati Bhargava and Rohan Bhargava.The amount invested in the three start-ups was not disclosed.Ratan Tata had invested in 14 start-ups in 2015.Five-year old start-up FirstCry sees Tata’s investment as an endorsement of its business philosophy. “A positive nod from a business leader of Tata’s stature is a great vote of confidence in the way we have created the eco-system and validation of our business approach to profitability. We are delighted to have him on board and look forward to gaining from his experience,” said Supam Maheshwari, founder & CEO of Brainbees, which owns FirstCry, reported Dealstreet Asia.Dealstreet Asia also reported that Brainbees has raised $69 million in several rounds from IDG Ventures India, SAIF Partners, Vertex Ventures, Valiant Capital and NEA.Tata joined IDG Ventures India as a senior advisor in September 2015. The firm is an early-stage investor in many e-commerce firms and start-ups, including Myntra, Lenskart, Zivame, Vserv, Manthan, Perfint, NestAway, Hiree, and Uniphore.In other news, Indian real-estate portal Housing.com has received a fresh funding of $15 million from Japan’s SoftBank.Investors in Housing.com include Nexus Venture Partners, DST Global LP, Falcon Edge Capital LP, Digital Nirvana Fund Co Ltd, Qualcomm Ventures and Helion Venture Partners, reported Dealstreet Asia.The Indian start-up sector is expected to get a fillip in the coming months, with the launch of the “Start-up India” programme by Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s NDA government last week.The government announced a slew of incentives to support Indian start-ups, which number about 4,200, according to software services body Nasscom.last_img read more

Forts folklores and music

first_imgJust a few hours away from the Capital there is a musical storm building up. Rajasthan International Folk Festival, which is among one of the biggest music fest in the world is just round the corner. Millennium Post speaks to Divya Bhatia, the director of the fest to bring you insights what to expect this year.If you are a music lover take some time out in October and drive down to attend this year’s RIFF. The fest takes place every year on Sharad Purnima, this year it will take place at Mehrangarh Ford.   Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’What should music lovers expect this year?This year’s Jodhpur RIFF will bring together interlinked strands to create a captivating program built around the exceptional variety of Rajasthani music and countries rich tradition in percussion and the unique musical heritage of nomads. The multi-platform festival includes unique events from dawn devotional concerts to hip club nights; and exciting collaborations with musicians from across the globe.What are the key attractions of the fest this year? Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixOur focus on the Manganiyar community, the Gypsy Allstars, a Rajasthani percussion workshop, Manu Chao’s set, the legacy of Bhikari Thakur by Kalpana Patowary, Daud Khan master of the roabab, collaboration between an Australian and Rajasthani artists, a special performance by the Manganiyar artists among others!Tell us about the Jodhpur-RIFF from a director’s point of view?It is a dream project for anyone to do, it gives me an unusual context to work in, a wonderful vision to evolve that can be measured in decades (not years), stalwart mentors to guide, a unique city and stunning location to animate. It’s extremely challenging and therefore very satisfying if done well. Most of all, work with and for some of the best musicians in the world. Arranging the whole fest is a difficult task would you like to share any good/bad incidences that have taken place during the process?They have been mostly good. Being invited to present legendary folk musicians at the Edinburgh International Festival and the visit of the Scottish Foreign Minister to RIFF last year; facilitating and enabling the collaboration with Dharohar project and Mumford and Sons and the royalties to the folk artists after that; being on a list of best international festivals for four years in a row.Tell us more about the documentary Bidesia in Bambai?Bidesia in Bambai is an unusual film by film maker Surabhi Sharma – about the mobile culture, migration to Mumbai and Bhojpuri music in the city. Surabhi’s explorations are postmodern and they provide a perfect counterpoint to our presentations of pure folk, while opening new spaces for dialogue on modernity and folk music.last_img read more

Indianorigin man Singapores new envoy to Lanka

first_imgSingapore has appointed an Indian- origin businessman as its non-Resident High Commissioner to Sri Lanka, the Foreign Ministry announced on Thursday.S Chandra Das served as Singapore’s Ambassador to the Republic of Turkey, resident in Singapore, from 2006 to 2015.He had also previously served as Singapore’s Trade Representative from 1970 to 1972 in the USSR, the former Soviet Union.Das was a Member of Parliament from 1980 to 1996 and is currently the Managing Director of NUR Investment and Trading private limited of Singapore as well as a director of a number of other companies. Also Read – Pro-Govt supporters rally as Hong Kong’s divisions deepenDas is married to Rosie Pillai and they have two children.The Ministry also announced the appointment of Chua Thai Keong as Singapore’s High Commissioner to the Republic of South Africa.Chua has previously served as Singapore’s Ambassador to the Republic of Korea (with concurrent accreditation to Mongolia) from September 2006 to December 2010 and Singapore’s Non-Resident Ambassador to Chile from April 2014 to May 2015.last_img read more

49yearold man donates his organs

first_imgKolkata: The city on Tuesday witnessed another incident of organ donation at a private hospital.Ranjan Roy (49), a resident of Baruipur in South 24-Parganas was pronounced brain-dead on Tuesday morning by a team of doctors at a private hospital in Ekbalpore. The victim’s wife agreed to donate his organs after counselling.According to the hospital sources, two kidneys and the skin of the patient would be taken to SSKM Hospital after they taken, while his liver would be taken to a private hospital off EM Bypass. His eyes will be donated to a private eye hospital group. The process has started on Tuesday evening. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeIt was learnt that SSKM Hospital and the private hospital have already arranged the persons who need the organs. A new lease of life would be given to a number of people. The victim was admitted to the private hospital following an accident. He had undergone a neurosurgery after he was brought to the hospital. He was declared brain dead after four days of the incident happened.The victim’s wife had shown great courage as she decided to let her husband’s legacy live on through the process of organ donation.The woman was present at the hospital premises along with her 9-year-old daughter when the process had been started this evening.”The donor’s wife played a crucial role for making this happen. We thank her whole-heartedly for this extremely compassionate act. We are proud to be part of this selfless donation and we will continue to build on this momentum,” a senior official of the private hospital said.last_img read more

Going to the Bank Again Say Goodbye to That

first_img Enroll Now for Free Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own. This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now I started my company while I was a college student, swimming in technology; I could literally run my business from my phone in the hall between classes and have everything available at the touch of a button. Well, nearly everything. The big exception was . . . banking.Related: Five Fintech Startups To WatchAs I quickly learned, when you’re used to handling everything digitally, a trip to the bank can really slow you down.Fortunately, things are changing. I believe that the bank of the future will look very different from banks today, and my fellow millennials are helping to speed this change along. What’s driving this change? Expectations and frustration.Three generations compose the U.S. workforce today: baby boomers, Gen X and millennials — and as of 2015, millennials have become the largest group. Why is this important? Because millennials represent a lot of purchasing power, so our preferences matter.We don’t want to adapt our habits to fit the rigid way that banks operate today; that’s not our style. Instead, we expect banks to support our lifestyle. If everything else is on my phone, why can’t my bank be? Why can’t getting a loan, mortgage or credit card be as easy as plugging a new service into a Google Apps account?According to the Millennial Disruption Index — a three-year study that surveyed 10,000 millennials — my generation is generally frustrated with traditional banks, and one-third of us think that within five years we won’t even need a bank. The study also found that almost half of us believe tech startups are going to change the way banking works.I’m inclined to agree. Tech disruption in the banking sector is not some fuzzy future possibility — it’s already happening.Financial technology (FinTech) companies like Mint are forging ahead down this path. Sign up with Mint on your phone and within minutes you’ll have help managing your bills and analyzing your spending patterns, and figuring out what credit card to get. For tech-savvy millennials, user-friendly yet powerful services like this are clearly attractive.Other FinTech firms focus on areas like payments and money transfers. For example, nTrust allows users to securely manage and instantly move their money in the cloud, whether those dollars are going to a friend paying the bill at a restaurant or a family member travelling abroad. If you give millennials the choice to instantly transfer money for free by phone, versus paying a bank for a transfer that will take hours, it’s obvious which option we’re going to choose.As millennials embrace these powerful new FinTech services, traditional banks are realizing that they need to get in the game or risk being left behind. No surprise then that we have seen several recent examples of financial institutions partnering with fintech companies.Related: Fintech At The Forefront: PayFort Announces New MENA AcceleratorFor example, Santander UK partnered with two tech firms to create the KiTTi app, which makes it easy to pool money with your friends for things like vacations and team fees. In October 2015, three major banks invested in Kabbage, an Atlanta-based FinTech firm that helps small businesses open a line of credit. Nor are these partnerships confined to the United States or Europe: In January 2016, Alterna Bank partnered with a startup in Vancouver, BC, called Lendful, to provide simple online access to consumer loans of up to $35,000.These partnerships aren’t just financial institutions and FinTech companies working together to provide new services. I believe that we’re seeing the “bank of the future” being born.I also believe that millennials and companies like mine will come out on top, with financial services that are more aligned with our expectations — in other words, fast, digital and versatile. Meanwhile, the FinTech companies that best provide these services will thrive if they can continue to innovate and set the bar for tomorrow’s banks.Related: Fintech, The Wake Up Call For BanksI suspect that the big banks will also pull through, thanks largely to their deep pockets. But they will need to evolve much faster by partnering with FinTech firms or building their own teams to drive innovation, or perhaps doing both. 4 min read April 14, 2016last_img read more

WE preview tonights clash with Bradford Bulls on

first_imgWE preview tonight’s clash with Bradford Bulls on the latest edition of the Saints In Touch Podcast.Nathan Brown and Jordan Turner talk about the match whilst we also hear from Anthony Laffranchi.The Italian international tell us his future plans.The weekly Podcast is the ideal way to keep up to date with the Saints and can be found on iTunes.It is in association with our good friends at Citytalk 105.9.To listen, simply click here or search for St Helens RFC on iTunes – you can also hear past episodes there too.Remember if you want a question answering on the Podcast drop us a line @saints1890 on Twitter or email us here.last_img