Nancy Cline retires to accolades

first_imgWhen she retires from her post as the Roy E. Larsen Librarian of Harvard College next month, efforts to sum up the career of Nancy Cline will invariably point to the massive, multi-year renovation of Widener Library as one of her greatest accomplishments. Such efforts, however, only scratch the surface of a career that has spanned dramatic change for Harvard’s libraries. In her 15-year tenure, Cline changed not just the physical appearance of the libraries, but the very nature of how patrons – whether students, faculty or researchers – interact with them.An early advocate for bringing the digital world inside the walls of the library, Cline helped innovate new methods of preservation through digitization and pioneered new ways of delivering library materials to users all over the world, all while continuing to deliver service to Harvard students and faculty, and the wider academic community.“If we think about the time Nancy Cline has been at Harvard, and what we thought libraries were when she arrived, and what we now understand libraries to be – it’s nothing short of a complete revolution,” said Harvard University President Drew Gilpin Faust. “Nancy has been in the forefront of that change, has enabled Harvard’s libraries to sustain a leadership role in that change, and to adapt and grow in extraordinarily transformative times.“What Harvard is, in no small part, is what its libraries are,” Faust continued. “This University is deeply dependent on its libraries, and Nancy has served on many national and international boards and committees, helping not just Harvard, but the wider world, to understand what has happened, and what is going to happen in the world of libraries. She has been a force in our digitization efforts, and in many of the other ways we have seized the future.” Read Full Storylast_img read more

EMV for debit: On the payments horizon

first_imgAs a credit union decision-maker, you are well aware that EMV technology is emerging as the new security standard for card-present payments here in the U.S, and that EMV adoption is moving forward much faster for credit than for debit.While the conversion to EMV technology brings with it increased fraud protection for consumers, your credit union may be struggling with the uncertainties of these uncharted waters, especially on the debit side of the equation.“EMV for credit is moving into the U.S. marketplace now, so credit unions have some visibility into how this technology will impact their business,” said Michelle Thornton, director of product development for CO-OP Financial Services. “EMV for debit is another story. Because the technology required to meet U.S. regulations is still in the development and implementation phase, the industry is diligently working to deploy this in the market.” continue reading » 20SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

Trade Ministry, TFO Canada team up to promote food, IT exports

first_imgThe Indonesian Trade Ministry and Canada’s Trade Facilitation Office (TFO), a nonprofit organization, signed on Tuesday a memorandum of understanding (MOU) on cooperation in export promotion amid the subdued global trade caused by COVID-19.Kasan Muhri, the director general of national export development at the ministry, said on Tuesday the partnership was aimed at promoting exports of processed food products and information and technology services.The two parties plan to team up for promotional activities with a special focus on women-led small businesses, capacity building and technical assistance for exporters, while exchanging information on export development and trade-related opportunities. “In this case, the [directorate general] will encourage Indonesian exports, which in recent years have faced many obstacles, including COVID-19, which has made businesses more careful in conducting trade partnership relations,” Kasan said in a virtual press conference on Tuesday.The cooperation follows Indonesia’s attempt to boost trade, which has been depressed by the ongoing global health crisis.Although the country recorded the biggest trade surplus in nine years in July, exports still declined by 9.9 percent year-on-year (yoy) to US$13.73 billion, while imports nosedived 32.55 percent yoy to $10.47 billion, according to Statistics Indonesia (BPS) data.The World Trade Organization (WTO) has forecast global trade will contract by between 13 and 32 percent at worst this year. Indonesia’s envoy to Canada Abdul Kadir Jailani said that the new cooperation laid further groundwork to step up trade between the two countries, either in the form of regional or bilateral free trade agreements.“A bilateral free trade agreement will not only boost bilateral trade. But more than that, it will also help to enhance competitiveness, attract more Canadian investment to the country and pave pathways to wider areas of cooperation and untapped potential,” said Jailani, who also represents Indonesia at the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO).Indonesia’s merchandise exports to Canada amounted to $844.65 million in 2019, marking an 8.2 percent decline from a year earlier, according to data from the United Nations International Trade Statistics Database (UN Comtrade).Rubber topped Indonesia’s exports last year reaching $104.20 million, followed by footwear, iron or steel and uncoated paper.Indonesia is Canada’s largest export market in Southeast Asia. Canada’s top export to Indonesia last year was wheat, which amounted to $701 million. It was followed by fertilizers and wood pulp.“So, we have worked in areas such as apparel, coffee, footwear, processed food and services,” said Steven Tipman, the executive director of TFO Canada.“Today’s MOU signing will really serve as the umbrella agreement for the cooperation of both our organizations in the areas of trade promotion and capacity building of Indonesian trade support institutions, as well as [small and medium enterprises].”Topics :last_img read more