Making ‘a case for the small’

first_img“I want to make a case for the small,” said Danielle Allen, James Bryant Conant University Professor and director of Harvard’s Edmond J. Safra Center for Ethics, for “the things that build a life of commitment.”Giving the keynote address for the Hutchins Center Symposium on Martin Luther King Jr. at the Harvard Kennedy School on Friday, Allen began by noting that although the Civil Rights leader “painted on a canvas that feels big,” she and many of her colleagues find themselves advocating smaller-scale activism — and worrying that they are not making a difference.Frequently citing King’s writings, Allen noted, “Through our scientific and technical genius, we’ve made of this world a neighborhood, and yet we’ve not had the ethical commitment to make it a brotherhood.”In a talk that referred frequently to colleagues, many of whom were present and who had spoken earlier at the daylong symposium, Allen shared that she was not initially a fan of “the small,” preferring instead to focus on broad issues concerning domination, attacking the social and economic implications of racial injustice head-on.However, in response to Harvard President Drew Faust’s entreaties, she had spent much of the last two years managing a task force on University inclusion and belonging. With data revealing that the population of African-American scholars in some Harvard programs had slipped, she confessed, “There came a certain point last fall where, in all honesty, I was pretty tired” of the effort.,But even though, she said, she worried that her energies were being frittered away on trivialities, she did find bright spots. For example, she found that the Office for Diversity Inclusion and Community Partnership at the Medical School was doing important work, “changing how students are experiencing the campus,” said Allen. She went on to credit that office’s dean, Joan Y. Reede.“It’s the Civil Rights Movement,” Allen said Reede told her. “It never ended.”That conversation gave Allen pause. “You might think working on something like inclusion and belonging at one of the most elite places in the world doesn’t really count as participating in the Civil Rights Movement,” she said. What she realized was that these smaller, seemingly discrete efforts are all part of a larger whole — that even work toward progress at a university like Harvard will have implications for society.“What we are building here are halls of power,” she said. “And the halls of power are connected to the guns and the prison watch towers. It’s never just about us here at places like Harvard.”,The challenge she threw out to the Harvard community audience was simple: “How do you put together the opportunity and a context like this with the basic inequality that plagues our world?”Paraphrasing Cornel West, professor of the practice of public philosophy at the Divinity School and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, who was seated near her, she rephrased her challenge: “It’s a question of whether or not as a professional you stay a warrior or as a professional you become a conformer.”The ways in which that challenge can be answered vary, and some methods can seem, if not small, then quixotic. As an example, Allen cited the work of Bryan Stevenson, M.P.P./J.D. ’85, a social activist and attorney who has long campaigned against bias in the courtroom. Stevenson, Allen noted, realized that the issue underlying the racism of some judges and juries was often simply rooted in ignorance. His answer has been to work to establish the Memorial to Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Ala., opening this month, which documents the more than 4,000 lynchings of black people in the South.“What he was doing was establishing a foundation for the creation of the ethical commitment to brotherhood. It’s not just about policy, it’s also about the intellectual paradigms.”last_img read more

Do This: Long Island Event Listings for November 2013

first_imgThird Eye BlindA House of Blues 20th anniversary gig, the San Francisco alt-rockers will blast through an energetic set of tunes spanning their 1997 breakthrough self-titled debut through their forthcoming “Born In Shadow.” Expect to hear radio smashers “Semi-Charmed Life,” “How’s It Going To Be” and “Jumper,” for sure. With Gentlemen Hall. The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington. paramountny.com $44.50-$90.25. 8 p.m./Doors 7 p.m.November 7.LI Gay and Lesbian Film FestivalNow in its 16th year, this cinematic celebration highlights the best in international and American Gay and Lesbian filmmaking, including candid interviews with their creators, parties, cocktail receptions, food and so much more. Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave., Huntington. www.cinemaartscentre.org $15 members, $20 public; includes reception. Festival pass: $60 members, $80 public. Opening/closing night: $15 members, $20 public. Varying show times. (Launch party November 3. Check out www.liglff.org for more details.) November 8 through November 11.6th Annual International Great Beer Expo: Long IslandBeer-lovers’ paradise. This international beer tasting extravaganza showcases more than 50 breweries from around the world, offering more than 100 different beers spanning Sweden and China to Blue Point and Montauk. Admission includes a 5 oz. souvenir tasting glass and access to sample 2 oz. nips from any exhibiting brewery. Belmont Park Racetrack, 2150 Hempstead Tpke., Elmont. www.greatbeerexpo.com Online: $45; Event Day: $55; Designated Driver: $12. Session I: 12:30 p.m.-4 p.m. Session II: 5:50 p.m.-9 p.m. November 9.Alkaline Trio/New Found Glory/H20Punk rock mayhem.The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington. paramountny.com $33.50-$57.50. 8 p.m./Doors7 p.m. November 9.The Cake Boss: Buddy ValastroLearn from the master himself. The loveable celebrity baker from Hoboken will lead an interactive baking bonanza full of cake and cupcake demos, sharing tips, techniques and stories from “The Cake Boss” and “The Next Great Baker” while fielding audience questions. Not to be missed! NYCB Theatre at Westbury, 960 Brush Hollow Rd., Westbury. www.westburymusicfair.org $64-$341. 3 p.m. November 10.Disney On Ice – Let’s Celebrate!Join Mickey, Minnie, Cinderella, Buzz Lightyear and too many other lovable characters to list here as they herald holidays and festivities from across the globe. Barclays Center, 620 Atlantic Ave., Brooklyn. $34-$117.35. November 12-15, 7 p.m. November 16, 11 a.m., 3 p.m. & 7 p.m. November 17, 11 a.m. & 3 p.m. November 12 through 17.Brian KilmeadeThe Fox & Friends co-host will sign copies of his new book “George Washington’s Secret Six: The Spy Ring That Saved the American Revolution,” sharing the true story of his top-secret Long Island-based Culper Spy Ring. Book Revue, 313 New York Ave., Huntington. www.bookrevue.com 7 p.m. November 12.Reel Big Fish/GoldfingerThe California ska-punk stalwarts will be rolling out hits from their respective ska-tellite cannons including “Sell Out” and “Superman” in support of “The Don’t Stop Skankin’ Tour.” With Beautiful Bodies and Beebs & Her Money Maker. The Paramount, 370 New York Ave.,Huntington. paramountny.com $25-$58.50. 8 p.m./Doors 7 p.m. November 13Issues In Judaism Lecture SeriesThe second of two lectures in this fall’s series, journalist and author Houman Sarshar will explore “The Role of Iranian Jews in the Preservation, Proliferation, and Development of Persian Music.” Prepare to be enlightened and inspired. Leo A. Guthart Cultural Center Theater, Hofstra University, Hempstead. Hofstra.edu $8; $7 senior citizens over 65; free for faculty, staff and students. 7 p.m.-9 p.m. November 14.High On FireCalifornia stoner metal shredders HOF destroy NYC with Matt Pike’s apocalyptic virtuosity in full rain-down-hell-wrapped-as-heaven mode. He is metal’s Jimi Hendrix. Do not miss this gig. With Kvelertak and Doomriders. Webster Hall, 125 E. 11th St., Manhattan. www.websterhall.com $20/DOS $20. 7 p.m./Doors 6 p.m. November 15.Fish and SipsWhat a perfect combo: marine animals and wine! Now in its sixth year, this tasting will offer the nectars of more than 20 wineries along with food and live music. Long Island Aquarium and Exhibition Center, 431 E. Main St., Riverhead. www.longislandaquarium.com $39.95. 7 p.m.-10:30 p.m. November 15.Ani DiFrancoExperimental indie folksinger who paints soundscapes of colors with strokes of lightning. With Gregory Alan Isakov and Buddy Wakefield. Music Hall of Williamsburg, 66 N. Sixth St., Brooklyn. www.musichallofwilliamsburg.com $48. 8 p.m./Doors 7 p.m. November 15.StyxNYCB Theatre at Westbury, 960 Brush Hollow Rd., Westbury. www.westburymusicfair.org $69.50. 8 p.m. November 15 & 16.Mark Morris Dance GroupOne of the world’s leading dance companies, the M-squared group is renowned for many other reasons, especially for translating the spirituality and mortality of classical music into dance. Staller Center for the Arts, SUNY Stony Brook, Stony Brook. www.stallercenter.com $40. 8 p.m. November 16.Arlo GuthrieWoody’s eldest son will perform originals and many of his dad’s famous ballads in celebration of the legendary folk singer’s 100th birthday in this truly special night, titled “Here Comes The Kid: A Tribute To Woody Guthrie.” Come experience the music that’s inspired everyone from Bob Dylan to the Clash. The Patchogue Theatre for the Performing Arts, 71 E. Main St., Patchogue. patchoguetheatre.com $38-$68. 8 p.m. November 16.18th Annual Autumn Arts & Crafts FestivalMore than 150 talented artisans plying jewelry, art, ceramics, gourmet food, stained glass and pottery? Sounds like a party! 200 Independence Plaza, Selden. $5, kids under 12 free. Saturday 10 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sunday 10 a.m.-5 p.m. November 16 & 17.ZZ TopThe legendary Rock and Roll Hall ofFamers unleash their timeless brand of bearded blues-rock through a two-night stand! The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington. paramountny.com $69.50-$143.25. 8 p.m./Doors 7 p.m. November 16 & 17.America’s Got Talent LiveWho is the next big act? What could they possibly do to win such a showcase? Only one way to find out! (But is there really anyone more talented than Kenichi, seriously!?) NYCB Theatre at Westbury, 960 Brush Hollow Rd., Westbury. www.westburymusicfair.org $49.50-$79.50. 5 p.m. November 17.Peter MaxThe pop art icon and renowned visual artist will be signing copies of his new book “The Universe of Peter Max”—a colorful and intimate collection of artwork and 50 personal essays sharing his life story, one masterpiece at a time. Book Revue, 313 New York Ave., Huntington. www.bookrevue.com 7 p.m. November 19.Kanye WestKim’s bad-boy megastar storms Brooklyn for a two-night YEEZUS Tour rife with hits from his six consecutive #1 albums and slew of singles. Will he rock? Yes. Will he say something controversial? Bet on it. (He stomps on MSG the following two nights.) With Kenrick Lamar and A TrIbe Called Quest, respectively. Barclays Center, 620 Atlantic Ave., Brooklyn. $49.50-$225.50. 7:30 p.m. November 19 & 20.Alive InsideMusic soothes the soul, raises the spirits, heals all wounds. This special screening of Alive Inside, which documents music’s special ability to resurrect memories in Alzheimer’s and dementia sufferers, is sure to fascinate and inspire. Followed by discussion with Music & Memory founder Dan Cohen and North Shore-LIJ’s Dr. Maria Torroella Carney and Dr. Howard Guzik. Landmark on Main Street, 232 Main St., Port Washington. Free. 7:30 p.m. November 21.LeAnn RimesCountry pop sensation belts out sultry numbers from her latest, “Spitfire.” The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington. paramountny.com $35-$101.75. 8 p.m./Doors 7 p.m. November 21.Irving Berlin’s “White Christmas”Follow Bob Wallace and Phil Davis in their timeless quest to win the hearts of the Hanes sisters and save the lodge. John W. Engeman Theater, 250 Main St., Northport. Engemantheater.com $65. 2, 3 & 8 p.m. November 21 through January 5.Rocky Horror Picture ShowCome in costume and get ready to do the “Time Warp”! CM Performing Arts Center, 931 Montauk Hwy., Oakdale. www.cmpac.com $20. Saturdays, midnight. Through November 22.WeezerRivers Cuomo and gang rock Huntington. Will they perform tracks from their as-yet-unreleased new album? Perhaps some favs from “The Blue Album,” such as “Buddy Holly” and “Undone-The Sweater Song”!? What about “Pinkerton,” or tear-jerker “Butterfly”!? Only one way to find out. With Elliot & The Ghost. The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington. paramountny.com $55, $69.50, $79.50, $95. 8 p.m./Doors 7 p.m. November 24.“How To Succeed In Business Without Really Trying”Musical comedy at its finest and most hilarious. Dix Hills Performing Arts Center at Five Towns College, 305 N. Service Rd., Dix Hills. www.dhpac.org $18; $15 students. November 21-23; 7:30 p.m. November 24; 2 p.m. November 21 through November 24.Blues TravelerThe harmonica-heavy rockers break in LI’s newly resurrected venue, ensure good vibes, great times and whole lotta jiving toots from frontman John Popper. “Run-Around” is sure to make a dancer out of all those in attendance. The Space at Westbury, 250 Post Ave., Westbury. www.thespaceatwestbury.com $30 Advance/$35 DOS. 8 p.m./Doors 7 p.m. November 27.GusterAcoustic alt-rock jokesters. Expect to hear 2006 ear candy “Satellite.” With Ben Kweller. Beacon Theatre, 2124 Broadway, Manhattan. www.beacontheatre.com $44.50. 8 p.m./Doors 7 p.m. November 30.Classic Albums Live: Abbey RoadThe Toronto-based concert series known for its emotionally meticulous virtuosity in performing epic albums “note for note—cut for cut” transforms the Paramount into an Octopus’ Garden of beauty, magic and harmonious melody with the Beatles’ swan song masterpiece in all its glory. This will be an unforgettable night, for sure. Bring a loved one. The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington. paramountny.com $18, $22, $40. 9 p.m./Doors 7 p.m. November 30. Sign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York last_img read more

Tickets on sale now for BAAC Art Auction

first_imgBatesville, In. — The 29th Annual Batesville Area Arts Council Art Auction will held February 8 at the Walhill Farm at 6 p.m.The event includes a silent auction and entertainment by the Endless Summer Band.For more information please call 812-933-0355.last_img