Beverage Bottle Battle

first_imgOnly 10 U.S. states have “bottle bills” requiring deposits on some beverage containers so consumers will return them. Those states recycle 70 percent of their bottles and cans, 2.5 times more than states without bottle bills. The beverage industry has spent millions fighting bottle bill legislation, even though beverage containers make up 5.6 percent of the U.S. waste stream. Credit: Mr. T. in DC, courtesy FlickrEarth Talk Bottle BillsDear EarthTalk: Why don’t more states mandate deposits on beverage bottles as incentives for people to return them? Most bottles I’ve seen only list a few states on them.— Alan Wu, Cary, NCSo-called bottle bills, otherwise known as container recycling laws, mandate that certain types of beverage containers require a small deposit (usually five or ten cents) at checkout beyond the price of the beverage itself. Customers can return the empty containers later and reclaim their nickels and dimes. The idea is to provide a financial incentive for consumers to recycle and to force industry to re-use the raw materials.According to the Container Recycling Institute (CRI), a California-based non-profit which encourages the collection and recycling of packaging materials (and runs the website BottleBill.org), the benefits of bottle bills include: supplying recyclable materials for a high-demand market; conserving energy, natural resources and landfill space; creating new businesses and green jobs; and reducing waste disposal costs and litter. The 10 U.S. states that currently have container recycling laws recycle at least 70 percent of their bottles and cans; this amounts to a recycling rate 2.5 times higher than in states without bottle bills.Beverage containers make up a whopping 5.6 percent of the overall U.S. waste stream, so every bottle and can that gets recycled counts toward freeing up landfill space. And CRI reports that beverage containers account for some 20 percent of the greenhouse gas emissions resulting from landfilling municipal solid waste and replacing the wasted products with new ones made from virgin feedstock. So by promoting more recycling, bottle bills indirectly reduce our carbon footprints.The 10 U.S. states with bottle bills are California, Connecticut, Hawaii, Iowa, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York, Oregon and Vermont. Delaware’s legislature repealed its bottle bill after almost three decades on the books last year as the state’s bottle recycling rate had dropped to just 12 percent due to more and more retailers refusing to deal with the hassle of accepting returned containers. In place of its bottle bill, Delaware enacted a $0.04/bottle recycling fee that will help defray the costs of starting up a curbside recycling pickup system to service the entire state.“We are extremely disappointed they chose to repeal their law, rather than enforce it,” reported CRI’s Susan Collins, adding that the new fee places a burden on consumers only. “Consumers will be subsidizing the producers and that is unfair.” CRI supports “extended producer responsibility” where producers and consumers together pay for the life cycle costs of product packaging.Beyond Delaware, the main reason bottle bills haven’t caught on is because of opposition to them by the beverage industry, which doesn’t want to bear the costs of recycling and claims that the extra nickel or dime on the initial cost of the beverage is enough to turn potential customers away. The U.S. Public Interest Research Group (USPIRG) found that the beverage industry and its representatives spent about $14 million in campaign contributions aimed at defeating a national bottle bill between 1989 and 1994. Meanwhile, members of a Senate committee who voted against national bottle bill legislation in 1992 received some 75 times more in beverage-industry PAC money than those who voted in favor of the bill.CONTACTS: Container Recycling Institute, www.container-recycling.org; USPIRG, www.uspirg.org.EarthTalk® is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E – The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Send questions to: [email protected] Subscribe: www.emagazine.com/subscribe. Free Trial Issue: www.emagazine.com/trial.last_img read more

Chanderpaul back on top of the world!

first_img Sharing is caring! 57 Views   no discussions Share Share Shivnarine ChanderpaulLONDON, England, Friday May 04, 2012 – Guyanese batsman Shivnarine Chanderpaul has regained the number-one spot in the International Cricket Council (ICC) Test batsmen rankings after hitting two half-centuries in the recent Dominica Test.Chanderpaul, who won the Sir Garfield Sobers Trophy for ICC Cricketer of the Year at the LG ICC Awards in Dubai in 2008, scored 68 and 69 which earned him 19 ratings points and helped him to leapfrog South Africa’s duo of AB de Villiers and Jacques Kallis into the number-one position. The 37-year-old player had first topped the batting chart in July 2008. After staying on top of the table for the following seven months, Chanderpaul briefly dropped to second position in February 2009 when he scored one and 55 against England in the second Test in Antigua.He nevertheless returned to the top spot three Tests later following scores of 147 not out and six in the fifth and last Test against England at Queen’s Park in Trinidad.Three months later, in May 2009, Chanderpaul lost his number-one position to Pakistan’s Younus Khan. He slipped to as low as 15th in June 2010 before making a charge up the order to finally surge to the top of the table.Chanderpaul has arrived in England as the number-one ranked batsman, as he did in May 2009, and while England will be out to defend its number-one Test team tag against the West Indies, the diminutive left-hander will be aiming to protect his top spot as he leads de Villiers by just six ratings points.In the Test bowlers’ rankings, West Indies’ Kemar Roach has gained two more places and is now on a career-best 16th position after figures of one for 72 and three for 40. The 23-year-old Barbadian had entered the series in 37th position and has gained 21 places after finishing as the most successful bowler of the series with 19 wickets at just under 20 runs per wicket.West Indies off-spinner Shane Shillingford, who had match figures of 10 for 219, has rocketed 21 places to 46th place.Caribbean 360 Newscenter_img Share Tweet NewsSports Chanderpaul back on top of the world! by: – May 4, 2012last_img read more