Lyons Hall hosts 25th Mara Fox 5k Run

first_imgNatalie Weber | The Observer Participants of the 25th annual Mara Fox 5k Run sprint toward the finish line Saturday. The event is hosted by Lyons Hall in honor of Mara Fox, a former Lyons resident who was killed by a car in 1993.To honor Fox, who was a resident in Lyons Hall, former Lyons rector Sister Kathleen Beatty started a walk in Fox’s name. In the 25 years since Fox’s death, the event has grown into a campus-wide race to raise funds for a study abroad scholarship in Fox’s name. And on Saturday, Lyons Hall hosted the last official Annual Mara Fox 5K Run and 1 Mile Fun Walk.“We had the first real official campus-wide Mara Fox Fun Run for two reasons — not just for the scholarship, but also to raise awareness about drinking and driving,” Beatty said. “So we had a lot of the campus dorms came and supported it and came out. We had people from the community.”More than 150 people attended this year’s race, sophomore Caroline Cooper, one of the race’s organizers, said. The scholarship funded by the race has grown to $300,000 and benefitted 51 students studying abroad in Toledo.“I think [the race] is important because it helps raise money for the Mara Fox scholarship which allows students to study abroad in Toledo, Spain, which was one of Mara’s dreams,” Cooper said. “Students — since the year she died — have been able to go and live out part of Mara’s dream, so we definitely feel very lucky that Mara’s watching over us in Lyons, too.”Senior Matthew Heeder is one such scholarship recipient. He said he participated in the race Saturday to support the scholarship that helped him achieve his goal of traveling to Spain.“Really, I wouldn’t be able to go without that [scholarship],” he said. “So [it’s] just unreal to come out here and give back in some tiny part of that and meet the family and thank them in person.”Of the race participants Saturday, freshman Michael Lee was the top male finisher and freshman Brianna Carlson was the top female finisher. Terry McCarthy, Fox’s stepfather, also participated in the race this year, a tradition he has kept up since the race was founded.“It has been the main motivator for me to keep running all these years,” he said Saturday. “I will be running the 5k today at 83, for the 24th time, and this year I’ve run 20 races so far. And the thing that has sustained me has been this wonderful devotion that we still have for Mara.”Teresa McCarthy, Fox’s mother, was also in attendance at the race. She said she remembers Fox for her spirit and love of the University.“She was our youngest daughter — youngest of three girls — and time comes, she was a military brat and had been moved around all her life, so when she came to Notre Dame, she knew it was going to be for a full four years and she loved it,” she said. “She loved her roommates, loved her studies.”Cooper also said in an email that Saturday’s run is not “necessarily the last run,” though Lyons Hall is looking into other possible fundraisers in honor of Mara.“The fate of the run and future fundraising events for Mara are still in flux at this time but there will still be events for Mara in the future,” Cooper said.Terry McCarthy said the University has promised to keep the scholarship fund going.“Now the family of Mara Rose Fox is completely assured that the scholarship will continue in perpetuity and that makes us feel just wonderful,” he said. “But we will continue to come back to Notre Dame for special occasions — either with the international studies or with Lyons Hall. We are eternally grateful to the fact that Lyons Hall, 25 years, has made this their signature event and brought all of these people together in memory of Mara Rose.”Beatty said she hopes the race leaves a lasting legacy that encourages people to take their decisions seriously.“It’s good that people keep learning and take responsibility and make better decisions in life,” she said. “That’s I think the goal for all of us as human beings is constantly growing and greater awareness of what we’re supposed to be doing in our lives.”Tags: Lyons Hall, Mara Fox, Mara Fox 5k Traveling to Spain with her parents, Mara Fox fell in love with Toledo. She hoped to study abroad there, and planned to pursue a minor in Spanish. She was enamored with the language and wanted to serve in Spanish-speaking communities.But she never had the chance to realize her dreams.In 1993, while walking back to campus, the then-freshman was hit and killed by a car. According to the South Bend Tribune, the driver “was still intoxicated at the time of his arrest,” though he was never convicted of drunk driving.last_img read more

“A very serious concern for public safety:” Broome County officials not happy with new discovery law

first_img“This is going to result in charges being dismissed against drug dealers and other drug offenders.” Another problem he said the law is causing: “We also have the New York State Police Crime Lab has informed us that they can not keep up with the demand of the drugs that we send up to be tested.” “We had a trial in county court last week where a witness who was a victim of a crime was contacted by the family of the defendant asking him if he was going to testify,” said Korchak. The mayor’s office estimates the current requirements of the law could cost the city between $150,000-$200,000 each year for additional personnel costs. “This is a very real situation, very serious concern for public safety,” said Korchak. He said not only does the law cut down on time, but also, “My fear is that witnesses will no longer come forward knowing that violent felons will immediately get their grand jury testimony, and most times these felons will be out of out custody when they get it.” Broome County District Attorney Michael Korchak has major bones to pick with the law. He says, “The discovery law creates a danger.” (WBNG) — Officials in Broome County are concerned about the new Discovery Law that took effect this year and the issues it poses for the community. Describing it, he said, “We have 1,500 felonies and several thousand misdemeanors that come through our system every year, we have to comply within 15 days all police reports, all witness statements, witness contact information has to be turned over, grand jury testimony has to be turned over, again, it’s an unworkable situation.” His fears continue to include more witness tampering and intimidation, a scenario that’s already happened in Broome County. “We’re asking lawmakers to take a step back, get the input of judges and district attorneys and make real changes to this law,” said Korchak. The two leaders, among others, want change. An issue he predicts could have a domino effect. Change, they say, is needed sooner rather than later. Binghamton Mayor Rich David explained the law is also negatively impacting the city’s police department by having to add personnel to keep up with its demands.last_img read more

ICC World Cup ICC Cricket World Cup 2019: Steve Smith called ‘cheat’ by fans, responds with ton as Australia beat England in warm-up

first_img For all the Latest Sports News News, ICC World Cup News, Download News Nation Android and iOS Mobile Apps. New Delhi: Steve Smith and David Warner were expected to have a rough reception when they arrived in England. The duo was banned for one year by Cricket Australia following the ball-tampering scandal during the Newlands Test versus South Africa in March 2018. The ban ended during the Pakistan series which Australia won 0-5 and in that period, Smith and Warner were plying their trades in several Twenty20 franchise leagues around the world. Warner was the leading run-getter in the 2019 Indian Premier League while Smith showed his class in the three warm-up games against New Zealand in Brisbane and in the clash against West Indies.Smith, who had blasted 22, 89*, 91* in the three games against New Zealand and also smashed 76 against West Indies in Southampton, responded in grand style to the taunts of cheat by fans with a grand century as Australia defeated England by 12 runs in the warm-up game ahead of the ICC Cricket World Cup 2019 at the Rose Bowl. Warner, who was also booed during his stay at the crease, contributed with a solid 43 and some solid contributions helped Australia reach 297/9. highlights In response, England was plagued with injuries to Jofra Archer, Eoin Morgan and Mark Wood and at one point, their fielding coach Paul Collingwood had to come onto the field and take up duties. James Vince and Jos Buttler smashed fifties but Jason Behrendorff and Kane Richardson took two wickets as England fell short.Monty Panesar ball-tamperingThe chants of ‘cheat’ on Smith and the booing of Warner comes at an interesting point in time for England and their cricket fans. Recently, Monty Panesar, the England left-arm spinner who was part of the 2009 Ashes triumph, has admitted in his autobiography Full Monty that England’s bowlers used mint, sunscreen and even the trouser zip to alter the condition of the ball.“We found that mints and sun cream had an effect on the saliva, and that helped the ball to reverse. I might also have ‘accidentally’ caught the ball on the zip of my trouser pocket to rough it up a little. That was probably a hairline fracture of the spirit of the game, even if the laws said you were allowed to ‘use your uniform’,” Panesar wrote in his autobiography.With the way how Smith and Warner were treated and with Panesar’s recent revelation, the ball-tampering conundrum will only deepen in the coming months, with Australia playing England in the Ashes immediately after the World Cup. Australia won by 12 runs against England in the World Cup warm-up clash.Monty Panesar has revealed he tampered with the ball in his autobiography.Australia will now play Sri Lanka in their final warm-up game.last_img read more