SMC holds first year discussion

first_imgSaint Mary’s College’s Common Experience program concluded for the semester Tuesday night with a short film and a student-led panel discussion, both of which focused on diversity and the problem of stereotyping other cultures. The Common Experience, a component of the Cross Currents Program, is designed to educate and mentor first year students at the College, spotlighting issues crucial to the first-year experience. Susan Vanek, associate dean of advising, said the Cross Currents Program helps first years navigate the educational and social landscapes of the College. “The goal and purpose of Common Experience is to introduce students to the importance of their education,” Vanek said. “Liberal arts and diversity are the cornerstone of a first rate college education.” The second and final installment of Common Experience Tuesday focused on diversity, and how recognizing our differences can help answer the ‘Why am I here?’ question for first year students, Karen Johnson, vice president for student affairs, said. “The ‘Why am I here?’ question … is answered for first years through peer mentoring, faculty advising and various activities in the residence halls,” she said. Johnson said after Tuesday’s film and panel, students met with their advisors, discussed the night’s activities and then will prepare a reflection on the film. The film, titled “The Danger of a Single Story,” features Nigerian author Chimamanda Adichie and struggles with overcoming the “single stories” people tell of African and Nigerian cultures. Adichie, who was awarded a MacArthur Fellowship and earned Master’s degrees from Johns Hopkins University and Yale University, speaks in the film about the dangers of partaking in single story telling. Adichie said a single story is when we hear only one story about a person and use that information to shape our views of other peoples and cultures. “Single stories rob people of their dignity,” she said in the film. “We are taught to emphasize how people are different, rather than how people are similar.” Adichie said people should recognize the positive effects of exploring other cultures and expanding their personal views. The film was followed by a panel discussion, led by junior Maeva Alexander and senior Alexandra Zellner. The discussion was a way for first year students to see how diversity can be lived out in everyday life, particularly at Saint Mary’s College. Alexander reflected on her time abroad in South Africa and how her single stories were drastically altered as a result of her experience. Zellner discussed the impact on stereotypes, focusing especially on labels Saint Mary’s and Notre Dame students can sometimes impose upon one another. Both Zellner and Alexander ended their discussions stressing the importance of working to push past single stories and celebrate similarities between peoples of different cultures, echoing the themes of Adichie’s talk in the film.last_img read more

Event to showcase majors

first_imgStudents can investigate the 65 possible undergraduate majors and other academic programs at Majors Night tonight for guidance on what direction their studies will go at Notre Dame. Faculty and students enrolled in these different majors will be available to advice students in South Dining Hall from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. tonight. Academic Affairs Committee member Toni Schreier said all students should feel welcome to attend this event. “We’ve organized this majors night as an opportunity for students of all levels – not just freshmen – to learn more about the opportunities, both academic and extracurricular, that Notre Dame has to offer,” she said. Schreier said upperclassmen who have already declared a major can still benefit from the information available. “[For upperclassmen,] it would just be an opportunity to confirm that’s what they want to do,” Schreier said. “If there’s an area they’ve always been interested in, they can find out the requirements for a minor and if it’s plausible.” Professor Thomas Stapleford in the Program of Liberal Studies (PLS) also encouraged students of all levels to attend. “It’s really valuable for a wide range of students,” Stapleford said. “This is a great opportunity to learn about other programs, even if you’re in a major right now, if you’re still not quite sure this is the one for you, this is a great chance to go and explore some other programs.” Schreier said students can really learn about what each department is like because both professors and students will be available. “You can find out about all the different classes you’d have to take, what the requirements are and if it’s possible to double major or minor,” Schreier said. Majors Night is a good time for students to learn about majors that are not as common or that might be unique to Notre Dame, Stapleford said. “[PLS] is unlike English or History, where students may have a rough idea of what they’re doing,” he said. “There are English departments in other universities. [PLS] is unique to Notre Dame. We get a chance to explain this to the students and answer any questions they might have.” Stapleford said the professors in attendance want to highlight the distinctive features of their disciplines for students so that it is easier for students to choose between majors. “In [PLS], there’s an emphasis on students who really love to read, students who like to think about ideas and write about ideas – students who have a broad range of interests.”last_img read more

Lyons Hall hosts 25th Mara Fox 5k Run

first_imgNatalie Weber | The Observer Participants of the 25th annual Mara Fox 5k Run sprint toward the finish line Saturday. The event is hosted by Lyons Hall in honor of Mara Fox, a former Lyons resident who was killed by a car in 1993.To honor Fox, who was a resident in Lyons Hall, former Lyons rector Sister Kathleen Beatty started a walk in Fox’s name. In the 25 years since Fox’s death, the event has grown into a campus-wide race to raise funds for a study abroad scholarship in Fox’s name. And on Saturday, Lyons Hall hosted the last official Annual Mara Fox 5K Run and 1 Mile Fun Walk.“We had the first real official campus-wide Mara Fox Fun Run for two reasons — not just for the scholarship, but also to raise awareness about drinking and driving,” Beatty said. “So we had a lot of the campus dorms came and supported it and came out. We had people from the community.”More than 150 people attended this year’s race, sophomore Caroline Cooper, one of the race’s organizers, said. The scholarship funded by the race has grown to $300,000 and benefitted 51 students studying abroad in Toledo.“I think [the race] is important because it helps raise money for the Mara Fox scholarship which allows students to study abroad in Toledo, Spain, which was one of Mara’s dreams,” Cooper said. “Students — since the year she died — have been able to go and live out part of Mara’s dream, so we definitely feel very lucky that Mara’s watching over us in Lyons, too.”Senior Matthew Heeder is one such scholarship recipient. He said he participated in the race Saturday to support the scholarship that helped him achieve his goal of traveling to Spain.“Really, I wouldn’t be able to go without that [scholarship],” he said. “So [it’s] just unreal to come out here and give back in some tiny part of that and meet the family and thank them in person.”Of the race participants Saturday, freshman Michael Lee was the top male finisher and freshman Brianna Carlson was the top female finisher. Terry McCarthy, Fox’s stepfather, also participated in the race this year, a tradition he has kept up since the race was founded.“It has been the main motivator for me to keep running all these years,” he said Saturday. “I will be running the 5k today at 83, for the 24th time, and this year I’ve run 20 races so far. And the thing that has sustained me has been this wonderful devotion that we still have for Mara.”Teresa McCarthy, Fox’s mother, was also in attendance at the race. She said she remembers Fox for her spirit and love of the University.“She was our youngest daughter — youngest of three girls — and time comes, she was a military brat and had been moved around all her life, so when she came to Notre Dame, she knew it was going to be for a full four years and she loved it,” she said. “She loved her roommates, loved her studies.”Cooper also said in an email that Saturday’s run is not “necessarily the last run,” though Lyons Hall is looking into other possible fundraisers in honor of Mara.“The fate of the run and future fundraising events for Mara are still in flux at this time but there will still be events for Mara in the future,” Cooper said.Terry McCarthy said the University has promised to keep the scholarship fund going.“Now the family of Mara Rose Fox is completely assured that the scholarship will continue in perpetuity and that makes us feel just wonderful,” he said. “But we will continue to come back to Notre Dame for special occasions — either with the international studies or with Lyons Hall. We are eternally grateful to the fact that Lyons Hall, 25 years, has made this their signature event and brought all of these people together in memory of Mara Rose.”Beatty said she hopes the race leaves a lasting legacy that encourages people to take their decisions seriously.“It’s good that people keep learning and take responsibility and make better decisions in life,” she said. “That’s I think the goal for all of us as human beings is constantly growing and greater awareness of what we’re supposed to be doing in our lives.”Tags: Lyons Hall, Mara Fox, Mara Fox 5k Traveling to Spain with her parents, Mara Fox fell in love with Toledo. She hoped to study abroad there, and planned to pursue a minor in Spanish. She was enamored with the language and wanted to serve in Spanish-speaking communities.But she never had the chance to realize her dreams.In 1993, while walking back to campus, the then-freshman was hit and killed by a car. According to the South Bend Tribune, the driver “was still intoxicated at the time of his arrest,” though he was never convicted of drunk driving.last_img read more

Get a First Look at Emma Watson in Beauty and the Beast

first_img The tale as old as time is heading to the big screen once more with a host of stage and screen favorites, and here’s your first look. Feast your eyes on the teaser trailer for Disney’s live-action Beauty and the Beast below. After a series of shots of that decrepit castle and a taste of Ewan McGregor’s Lumiere and Ian McKellen’s Cogsworth, we finally get our first glimpse of Emma Watson as Belle. To catch the rest of the cast, including Audra McDonald, Josh Gad, Emma Thompson and Dan Stevens, you’ll have to wait until March 17, 2017—or at least until we get another trailer. Emma Watson in ‘Beauty and the Beast’ View Commentslast_img

Bar takes legislative positions

first_img Bar takes legislative positions Dealing with constitutional amendments and lawyers for juveniles The Florida Bar Board of Governors has adopted two new legislative positions involving constitutional amendments and lawyers for juveniles, as the legislature worked on bills in both areas.Acting at its April 8 meeting in Tallahassee, the board followed the recommendation of the Legislation Committee and approved the recommendations of the Special Committee on Constitutional Amendments and the Legal Needs of Children Committee in adopting the new positions. (An official notice on both new lobbying stances is in this News. )At its January meeting, the board had tabled the proposal from the Special Committee on Constitutional Amendments. That panel advocated that the Bar adopt a position saying all constitutional amendments fit three criteria: They affect an existing provision of the constitution; they deal with a basic right of citizens; or they address the basic structure of government.Special committee Chair Harold Melville reported that the concern raised in January, that such an amendment might preclude the a future amendment on judicial nominating commissions, was unfounded. He noted that JNCs are already mentioned in the constitution, hence any further amendment would pass the “filter” test.The special committee also modified the recommendation to apply only to initiative amendments, and the board approved the new position.The legislature is considering a variety of issues on constitutional amendments, including requiring them to pass with 60 percent of the vote, requiring that they pass with 60 percent of the vote in 60 percent of the congressional districts, limiting the subject to basic issues, and tightening requirements for initiative petition signature gatherers.The second action came as a suggestion from the Legal Needs of Children Committee that the board adopt the committee’s position holding that children in the delinquency system should not be able to waive their right to an attorney unless they had a meaningful opportunity to consult with a lawyer on the waiver.The board approved the position unanimously. A bill to accomplish it has been introduced in the legislature. SB 1218, which provides that a child in the delinquency system must consult with a public defender if that child is not represented by a private attorney, cleared the Senate Criminal Justice Committee unanimously in April 1. The bill also specifically provides that a child may not waive the right to counsel until he or she has had a meaningful opportunity to consult with a lawyer. Bar takes legislative positions May 1, 2005 Regular Newslast_img read more

Fostering a culture of workplace advocacy

first_img 105SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,René Clayton René Clayton is an Innovation Strategist at PSCU, where she has more than 15 years of experience in technology and product development. She is passionate about identifying industry trends, conducting … Web: www.pscu.com Details Industries across the nation are beginning to recognize a growing need for a system whereby individuals within corporations can flourish through peer-to-peer information sharing and promotion. Career advocates is emerging in markets all over the world as a positive employee-growth tactic and development initiative. Mentorship programs within organizations have long been proven systems, but advocates in the workforce add an extra spark and create something more powerful and long lasting. While a mentor is trusted as a guide, an advocate beseeches on another’s behalf, promotes that person’s talents and encourages growth to best suit the individual’s abilities. Credit unions are inherently well-suited to such programs.The credit union industry was an early adopter in supporting an innovative approach that facilitates personal career development by empowering employees to encourage, support and assist their peers. Founded as cooperatives, credit unions practice what they preach through the credit union philosophy of “people helping people.” The values and culture of the industry are a solid source of differentiation and a competitive advantage.Providing a service-oriented and family-like atmosphere, the credit union industry has all the necessary building blocks to support a culture of workplace advocacy. But how do you move from a culture that is conducive to workplace advocacy to a workplace that puts it into practice? Here are three things to keep in mind when implementing a workplace advocacy program: An ideal advocate is someone who has tenure in the industry or organization and who is well-networked and well-informed of the goals and direction that the company strives to accomplish. These individuals seek out like-minded peers, help them network, introduce them to new opportunities and open dialogue with counterparts on their behalf. The personal investment an advocate makes in an employee can bring long-term positive effects to the company.According to Sylvia Ann Hewlett, “[Advocates] provide advice, contacts, opportunities and the all-important recommendation that can catapult a career into high gear.” Relationships need to be cultivated in order for an advocate to want to put his or her efforts into an individual. Talents, strengths, and weaknesses must be understood for the goals of the peer to be met. By true self-assessment and the sharing of information with colleagues, an advocate/peer relationship may be born. Share what you know. Research has proven that many leaders do not participate in or even understand their critical role as advocates. However, the importance of acting as a career advocate or having advocates in the office should not be underestimated. Leaders may not know the strengths, talents and skills an employee in another area possesses, but sharing knowledge and ideas with one another helps coworkers, leaders and staff gain a deeper understanding of the talent surrounding them. Advocates provide visibility as well as career traction. How can a workplace advocacy program help your credit union? It helps guide people in the right direction. While advocacy goes hand in hand with workplace mentorship, it is different. The benefits of a proactive advocacy program can filter down throughout the entire organization. The person being advocated for is likely to gain opportunities for which they may have been overlooked, and the advocate gets a chance to assist leadership by elevating qualified employees. With a solid workplace advocacy system in place, gone are the days where talent goes unnoticed. Career advocates personally connect individuals with other people within their networks, providing new opportunities for career advancement and other leaders with top talent referrals. Valuable team members are given more opportunities, feel more empowered and can ultimately better navigate their personal career paths. According to the Harvard Business Review, employees with advocates are proven to be more satisfied with their rate of advancement when compared to their unsupported colleagues. In the end, an employee who is supported by an advocate is likely to be a loyal and dedicated team member for years to come. last_img read more

Box Clever case handed back to Upper Tribunal as evidence debate continues

first_imgThe ongoing ITV vs Box Clever case has reached a new stage as the UK Court of Appeal handed back the debate to the Upper Tribunal, some 15 months after it left the court.The legal wrangling relates back to attempts by The Pensions Regulator (TPR) to issue a financial support direction (FSD) to ITV to cover the Box Clever pension scheme deficit.FSDs create a legal requirement on a company to contribute to deficit repairs within a pension scheme it has links to.The case will now be re-heard by the Upper Tribunal, which must decide if TPR and the trustees can use additional evidence submitted outside of its original FSD case, something that ITV requested be ignored. The Upper Tribunal is effectively an appeals court but does allow new evidence to be submitted as part of an ongoing case.It originally dismissed ITV’s protests over the new evidence, but the Court of Appeal has now requested the court re-examine the case from scratch.The Court of Appeal did not accept ITV’s request to have new evidence struck from the case, but, when referring the case back to the Upper Tribunal, it asked it to consider why additional evidence was submitted late on in the litigation.Hogan Lovells, the law firm representing ITV, said the judgment showed its questions regarding the late-stage submission of TPR’s evidence was important, and that it should not be approached on a “simplistic” basis.Angela Dimsdale Gill, the litigation partner for Hogan Lovells, said it welcomed the guidance from the Courts, as clarity was necessary for TPR, and others, over what the regulator can and cannot do.“The fact it is not to be taken as a given that the regulator can change its case whenever it pleases – as contended by the regulator – means it would do well to determine at the outset what the justification for its regulatory action is, since it will by no means be certain it will be able to change horses later on,” she added.A spokeswoman for TPR said: “The regulator is pleased the Court of Appeal has rejected the test advocated by ITV and that it has adopted a broad discretionary test, following arguments advanced by the regulator and trustees.”The case refers back to September 2011 when TPR issued a warning notice to ITV regarding the potential of an FSD. The regulator’s Determinations Panel decided to follow through three months later.ITV referred the £62m challenge from TPR and the trustees for Box Clever to the Upper Tribunal, where both parties made cases based on the evidence used within the FSD determination.However, in a second round of evidence, TPR amended its case, making different allegations against ITV over its funding for the Box Clever scheme, at which point ITV requested the new evidence be ignored.The Upper Tribunal rejected this appeal in December 2013 before ITV took the request to the Court of Appeal, which ruled this week.Dimsdale Gill said the next chapters of the case could prove significant for the pensions and business community – in a variety of ways, it would “test the threshold of the regulator’s powers”.It is likely the retrospective application of legislation will remain a key part of the case, given the power to issue FSDs did not exist until 2005, some two years after Box Clever’s failure and five after it was created.Box Clever was a joint venture set up in 2000 by Granada (now ITV) and Thorn TV, and included the creation of the pension scheme for transferred and new employees.The company failed in 2003, leaving a pension scheme deficit of around £60m (€82m).However, ITV said it never had any involvement in the scheme and oversaw no increase it its shortfall.Some 11 years after the failure of the firm, the Box Clever scheme entered PPF assessment in late 2014.last_img read more

IUEM Picks iXblue Subsea Solution for Geodetic Project Off Sicily

first_imgiXblue has been selected by the European Institute for Marine Studies (IUEM) to provide 8 Canopus LBL transponders for a major geodetic mission off the coast of Sicily. Deployed on the seabed, 2,500 meters below the surface, the Canopus transponders will measure the crustal deformation along the North-South Alfeo faults with a millimeter-scale resolution over the course of 4 years.Hubert Pelletier, Head of iXblue Acoustic division, said: “The fact that the IUEM, a long-standing partner of iXblue, trusts our new Canopus transponders for this challenging project is a big vote of confidence. Because the Canopus transponders precisely meet the exacting requirements of such a long-term subsea project, iXblue was chosen to provide autonomous and continuous monitoring of the movements of the tectonic plates along a 2 kilometers segment of the North-South Alfeo faults. “Installed on the seafloor along the faults, the transponders will measure, over the course of 4 years, the acoustic distance travel-time from one transponder to another to precisely determine their accurate distance. Thanks to those measurements, the IUEM will then be able to better characterize the way the fault behaves and will gain valuable insight into seismic risks,” explained Pelletier.“We needed a highly accurate and reliable system able to provide precise measurements over many years,” stated Jean-Yves Royer, in charge of the project at the IUEM. “The autonomy provided by the Canopus transponder, along with its ease-of-use and the availability of the iXblue teams during the tests phase were decisive factors in our choice of transponders for this major project.”last_img read more

Court junks PECO’s motion for reconsideration anew

first_imgThe properties were assessed to have a cumulative worth of P217.940 million. These include the Baldoza-La Paz substation; the General Luna substation; the Tabuc Suba, Jaro substation; the Bolilao, Mandurriao substation; and the Avancena Street, Molo substation. PECO went to the Court of Appeals (CA) twice for a temporary restraining order (TRO) to stop the expropriation case in the Iloilo RTC. After the implementation of the writ of possession, PECO then filed a supplemental petition with the CA asking that PECO be returned to possession with a status quo ante order, which was also denied. “Defendant PECO, in fact, had resorted to other legal remedies to question the said action of the court but as of this writing, there is no order from the higher court to rule otherwise. Wherefore, finding no cogent reason to set aside or disturb its earlier order, the motion for reconsideration is denied,” it added. In a March 5, 2020 order, the Energy Regulatory Commission revoked the company’s certificate of public convenience and necessity./PN PECO then went to the CA for the third time for a TRO to stop the implementation of the writ of possession issued by the Iloilo RTC, but was denied. The Iloilo RTC earlier ordered the sheriff to place MORE Electric Power Corporation (MORE Power) in possession of PECO properties identified for expropriation.center_img To recall, the franchise of PECO – previously the sole operator in Iloilo City – expired on Jan. 19. ILOILO City – A regional trial court (RTC) here has dismissed the motion for reconsideration filed by Panay Electric Co. (PECO) on the court’s earlier decision against the company. RTC Branch 23 Judge Emerald Requina-Contreras reiterated that PECO has no more franchise to operate as power distributor for Iloilo City. The CA rejected its argument which cited constitutionality issues as a valid reason to stop the expropriation case. “Defendant PECO should know this better as this has been what they have been invoking and the very reason why the court crafted the addendum,” the decision read.last_img read more

Betty I. Barton

first_imgBetty I. Barton, 82 of Milan passed away Saturday August 12, 2017 at Ripley Crossing. Betty was born Tuesday October 16, 1934 in Dearborn County the daughter of Walter and Crystal (Gosney) Hoppmire. She married Estel Barton November 22, 1958 and he preceded her in death February 15, 2015.She was a member of Pierceville United Methodist Church, and the Ripley County 4-H for almost 40 years. Betty was a homemaker and a caregiver. She enjoyed going to church, going out to eat and spending time with her family.Betty is survived by son: Donald (Kim) Barton of Milan; daughters: Berna (Roy) Meyer of Batesville, informally adopted daughter: Kim Yount of Ky; sister: June (Olus) Dixon of Milan. 6 Grandchildren, 6 Great-Grandchildren. She was preceded in death by her parents, husband Estel Barton and one daughter: Barbara Jean Barton.Funeral services will be 11AM Wednesday August 16, 2017 at Laws-Carr-Moore Funeral Home with Pastor Jack Bible and Pastor Harris Long officiating.  Burial will follow in St. Paul Lutheran Cemetery north of Milan. Visitation will be Tuesday 5-8PM also at the funeral home. Memorials may be made to Pierceville United Methodist Church, Ripley County 4-H and Milan Food Pantry. Go to www.lawscarrmoore.com to leave an online condolence message for the family.  Laws-Carr-Moore Funeral Home, Milan entrusted with arrangements. (812) 654- 2141. 707 South Main St. Box 243 Milan, In 47031.last_img read more