Hong Kong activists discuss ‘parliament-in-exile’ after China crackdown

first_imgHong Kong pro-democracy activists are discussing a plan to create an unofficial parliament-in-exile to keep the flame of democracy alive and send a message to China that freedom cannot be crushed, campaigner Simon Cheng told Reuters.Hong Kong, a former British colony that returned to Chinese rule in 1997, was convulsed by months of often violent pro-democracy, anti-China protests last year against Chinese interference in its promised freedoms, the biggest political crisis for Beijing since the Tiananmen Square protests of 1989.Hong Kong police fired water cannon and tear gas and arrested more than 300 people on Wednesday as protesters took to the streets again in defiance of new, sweeping security legislation introduced by China to snuff out dissent. “We are developing an alternative way to fight for democracy,” Cheng said. “We need to be clever to deal with the expanding totalitarianism: they are showing more powerful muscle to suppress so we need to be more subtle and agile.”He said more and more people were “losing hope that it is effective to go out on to the streets or run for election” to Hong Kong’s Legislative Council, or mini-parliament.”We should stand with the Hong Kong people and support those staying in Hong Kong,” he said.’Very good signal’Asked about HSBC’s support for the sweeping national security law, Cheng said the British government should speak to senior British capitalists to make them understand the importance of democracy.After Prime Minister Boris Johnson offered millions of Hong Kong residents the path to British citizenship following China’s imposition of the law, hundreds of thousands of people would come to the United Kingdom, Cheng said.”The UK has given a very good signal,” Cheng said. “At least hundreds of thousands of people will come.”Almost 3 million Hong Kong residents are eligible for the so called British National (Overseas) passport. There were 349,881 holders of the passports as of February, Britain said.”One day we will be back in Hong Kong,” Cheng said.Hong Kong returned to China 23 years ago with the guarantee of freedoms not enjoyed on the mainland, including its independent legal system and rights to gather and protest, under a “one country, two systems” formula.Huge protests calling for democracy, especially on the anniversaries of the June 4, 1989, Tiananmen crackdown, were common and brought major streets to a standstill for 79 days in the Umbrella movement of 2014.The national security law punishes crimes of secession, subversion, terrorism and collusion with foreign forces with up to life in prison, will see mainland security agencies in Hong Kong for the first time and allows extradition to the mainland for trial.Topics : The law pushes China’s freest city and one of the world’s most glittering financial hubs on to a more authoritarian path. China, which denies interfering in Hong Kong, has warned foreign powers not to meddle in its affairs.Cheng, a Hong Kong citizen, worked for the British consulate in the territory for almost two years until he fled after he said he was beaten and tortured by China’s secret police. Cheng, who has since been granted asylum by Britain, describes himself as pro-democracy campaigner.”A shadow parliament can send a very clear signal to Beijing and the Hong Kong authorities that democracy need not be at the mercy of Beijing,” he told Reuters in London. “We want to set up non-official civic groups that surely reflect the views of the Hong Kong people.”He said that while the idea was still at an early stage, such a parliament-in-exile would support the people of Hong Kong and the pro-democracy movement there. He declined to say where the parliament might sit.last_img read more

Governor Wolf Applauds Passage of Clean Slate Legislation

first_img Criminal Justice Reform,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Today, Governor Tom Wolf issued the following statement on the passage of House Bill 1419, the “Clean Slate” bill: “The Clean Slate bill helps us accomplish something I have worked hard to do since I took office, make our criminal justice system fairer, more equitable, and more focused on rehabilitation,” Governor Wolf said. “Passage of the Clean Slate law allows for many people to move on with their lives with greater chances for success. This means better career, housing and education options. “I thank the General Assembly for its bi-partisan efforts to pass this important piece of legislation that will help Pennsylvanians. It’s another step in the right direction to reform the state’s criminal justice system and allow people the opportunity to succeed. I look forward to signing this bill into law.” HB1419 provides those with low-level, non-violent criminal records a mechanism to have their record sealed from public view.Nearly 3 million Pennsylvanians of working age are estimated to have criminal records with many that are only minor. The legislation proposes the following structure for sealing records: Nonviolent Misdemeanor Convictions – Sealing would occur after an individual has remained crime-free for 10 years.Non-Conviction Records – Sealing would be done as a matter of course, given that the presumption of innocence is one of the bedrocks of the American criminal justice system. SHARE Email Facebook Twitter June 22, 2018center_img Governor Wolf Applauds Passage of Clean Slate Legislationlast_img read more

Daniel R. Tekulve

first_imgDaniel R. Tekulve, age 71 of Oldenburg, died Saturday, April 22, 2017 at his home.  Born March 30, 1946 in Batesville, he is the son of Clara (Nee: Holtel) and Arnold Tekulve.  He married Cheryl Lamppert September 8, 1973 at Holy Family Church in Oldenburg.  He served in the army during the Vietnam War.  A design engineer, Dan worked 10 years at Hill-Rom, 23 years at Wood-Mizer and was founder and President of Med-Mizer, starting the company in 2004.A devout man, faith was important to him.  Dan attended Mass daily, prayed the rosary daily and each year led the rosary during the Corpus Christi procession at Holy Family.  A huge Bengals fan, he’s been a season ticket holder since 1969 and attended both Super Bowls they played in at Detroit and Miami.  Although he owned Cricket Ridge Golf Course and Restaurant, his family teased that he wasn’t the greatest golfer, even though he played at least three times a week.  Many nights you would find him at the restaurant, sitting with friends watching Jeopardy and Wheel of Fortune.  A staple at Oldenburg’s Freudenfest, he was known for passing out flashing pins and each year purchased a pie during the pie auction to support the event.  He also enjoyed Jeep rides with the top off and visiting the Tiki Hut bar whenever he was in Hilton Head, South Carolina.  In his younger years,  Saturday nights were spent playing 500, which in recent years was replaced by poker night with his boys or friends.    His two biggest passions were time with his grandkids and spending a couple of evenings during the week and usually Sunday’s at the laDan is survived by his wife Cheryl; sons Josh (Hollie) of Whiteland, Indiana, Ryan (Sarah) of Batesville, Dusty (Kate) and Kyle (Erin), both of Oldenburg; brothers Tom of Batesville, Mike of Oldenburg and eight grandchildren.  In addition to his parents, he is also preceded in death by his infant son James.Visitation is Wednesday, April 26th, from 4 – 7 p.m. at the Weigel Funeral Home with a rosary service at 4 p.m.  Funeral services are 10 a.m. Thursday, April 27th, at Holy Family Church with Rev. David Kobak O.F.M. officiating.  Burial will follow in the church cemetery with military graveside rites conducted by the Batesville V.F.W. Post #3183 and the Prell-Bland American Legion Post #271.  The family requests memorials to the Holy Family Capital Building Fund.last_img read more

Water main repair could affect customers

first_imgHOLTON, Ind. — Officials with the Holton Water Corporation say that a water main repair will occur Tuesday (July 31) morning around 9:00 AM.Some customers may not have water or low pressure during the repair.last_img