Confirmed Apples new MacBook Pro gets a big speed boost

first_img MacOS Sierra 10.12.6; 3.1GHz Intel Core i5-7267; 8GB DDR3 SDRAM 2,133MHz, 1536MB Intel Iris Plus Graphics 650; 256GB SSD More consequential are the changes to the 13-inch MacBook Pro. That $1,299 model was a favorite for some, as it excluded the Touch Bar found in more-expensive MacBook Pros. Now you can no longer avoid the Touch Bar, but it’s included for the same $1,299 price, along with the TouchID fingerprint reader and T2 security chip. It also jumps from an older dual-core Intel CPU to a newer quad-core version, so the least expensive Pro feels more like, well, a Pro. Case in point, we ran the new quad-core 13-inch MacBook Pro against an older dual-core version. Yes, the eighth-gen chips have an advantage over the seventh-gen ones, but the difference between the two base models is huge.  MacBook Pro 13-inch (quad-core, 2019) • Aug 31 • Your phone screen is gross. Here’s how to clean it Computers Laptops MacBook Pro 13-inch (dual-core, 2017) 9032 MacOS Mojave 10.14.5; 1.4GHz Intel Core i5-8257; 8GB DDR3 SDRAM 2,133MHz; 1536MB Intel Iris Plus Graphics 645; 256GB SSD Now playing: Watch this: 647 Cinebench R15 CPU (multicore) MacBook Pro 13-inch (dual-core, 2017) See All Sarah Tew/CNET Apple kicked off the back-to-school season with some pretty significant changes to the MacBook lineup on Tuesday. There were price cuts, trickle-down features and a few quiet cancellations, including the old, pre-redesign MacBook Air and the cult favorite 12-inch MacBook. Getting an update are the MacBook Air and the lowest-end version of the 13-inch MacBook Pro. For the Air, that’s a significant point, as the system received its largest overhaul in a decade just last year. Both new MacBooks have arrived in the CNET Labs for review. Our testing is ongoing, but here’s an early look at some of the initial results and our first hands-on impressions. 05-macbook-pro-2019The entry-level MacBook Pro now includes Apple’s Touch Bar.  Sarah Tew/CNET The new MacBook Air doesn’t look any different, but it adds Apple’s True Tone display, which can adjust the screen’s color temperature based on the ambient lighting. It’s already found on iPad Pro, recent iPhones and some MacBook Pros. But more important than that, the starting price has been cut by $100, from $1,199 to $1,099 (£1,099, AU$1,699). That’s still not the classic MacBook Air price of $999, but it’s getting closer and students can get it for $999.  Back-to-school MacBooks get faster, cheaper Aug 31 • iPhone XR vs. iPhone 8 Plus: Which iPhone should you buy? Aug 31 • Verizon vs AT&T vs T-Mobile vs Sprint: Choose the best 5G carrier MacBook Pro 13-inch (quad-core, 2019) We’re currently testing both the new MacBook Pro and MacBook Air, and will report full benchmark results, including battery life, in upcoming reviews. While the Pro is getting a big speed boost, I wouldn’t expect any real change in the MacBook Air performance — the biggest move there is the price.  Note: Longer bars indicate better performance Tags 381 System Configurations reading • Hands-on with the new Apple MacBook Air and MacBook Pro 16949 MacBook Pro 13-inch (2017) 5:15 Apple MacBook Pro 13-inch (2019) Apple Share your voice Aug 31 • iPhone 11, Apple Watch 5 and more: The final rumors Comments Note: Longer bars indicate better performance 33 Geekbench 4 (multicore)last_img read more

Thermoelectric power plants could offer economically competitive renewable energy

first_img Toward a low-cost ‘artificial leaf’ that produces clean hydrogen fuel More information: Liping Liu. “Feasibility of large-scale power plants based on thermoelectric effects.” New Journal of Physics. DOI: 10.1088/1367-2630/16/12/123019 Liping Liu, Associate Professor at Rutgers University, envisions that thermoelectric power plants would look like giant barges sitting in the tropical ocean, where electricity is generated by heating cold, deep water with warm, shallow water heated by the sun. Liu has published a paper in the New Journal of Physics in which he analyzes the feasibility of such power plants.”This work is about the new idea of large-scale green power plants that make economic use of the largest accessible and sustainable energy reservoir on the earth,” Liu told Phys.org, speaking of the oceans. This is because the sun heats the surface water to a temperature that, in tropical regions, is about 20 K higher than water 600 m deep. Essentially, the surface water acts as a giant storage tank of solar energy.As Liu explains, thermoelectric power plants would work by harvesting the energy of ocean waves to pump cold water from a few hundred meters deep up through a long channel. As the cold water nears the surface, it enters a heat exchanger where it is heated by surface water on the outside. The heat exchanger acts as an electric generator, as its tubes are made of thermoelectric materials that can transfer heat through their walls and directly convert temperature differences into electricity.Large-scale, ocean-based thermoelectric power plants would have many advantages. For one, the “fuel” or temperature differences are free, unlimited, and easily accessible. Also, the plants do not take up space on land. Because they have no moving solid parts, they would have low maintenance costs. In addition, the power output does not depend on the time of day or season. And finally, the method is green, as it does not release emissions. In the new paper, Liu shows that large-scale thermoelectric power plants wouldn’t need to operate at extremely high efficiencies to be economically competitive; instead, the key would lie in engineering simple structures such as laminated composites in order to support mass production. These improvements focus on the conversion capacity, which, unlike efficiency, can be improved by orders of magnitude. In other words, because the fuel is free and in limitless supply, large-scale thermoelectric power plants could make up with their sheer size what they lack in efficiency.The cost of generating electricity varies by source. According to the US Department of Energy, the estimated cost per year of one megawatt of electricity in 2016 is about $0.83 million for conventional coal plants, compared to $1.84 million for photovoltaic power plants. Liu’s analysis estimates that a thermoelectric power plant could generate electricity for less than $1.84 million, although an exact estimate is difficult at this stage. This estimate is for a thermoelectric generator that lasts for 20 years and uses ocean water with a 10 K temperature difference as fuel. If water from geothermal sources is used instead, the temperature difference could be 50 K or more, resulting in an even higher power gain and lower cost per watt.Overall, the analysis shows that thermoelectric power plants look very promising and could contribute to solving the world’s energy problems. Liu plans to work toward this goal in future research.”We are currently working on experimentally validating the predicted power factor of the thermoelectric composites,” Liu said. “Once this is validated, we will seek to fabricate a table-top prototype of the generator that uses ice water and hot water as ‘fuel.'” Citation: Thermoelectric power plants could offer economically competitive renewable energy (2014, December 19) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2014-12-thermoelectric-power-economically-competitive-renewable.html A thermoelectric power plant can also use geothermal sources to produce the temperature gradient. Here, hot water is pumped up to the heat exchanger/generator, where it is cooled by air. Credit: Liu. (CC BY 3.0) Small-scale thermoelectric generators are already used commercially in applications such as microelectronics, automobiles, and power generation in remote areas. In these designs, the conversion efficiency is the most important factor because the fuel accounts for the largest portion of the cost. Most commercial devices have a conversion efficiency of around 5% to 10% of the ideal Carnot efficiency, with state-of-the-art devices achieving efficiencies of up to 20%. Although research is currently being done to further improve the efficiency, there are still limits to how high it can go. This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Journal information: New Journal of Physics (Phys.org)—A new study predicts that large-scale power plants based on thermoelectric effects, such as small temperature differences in ocean water, could generate electricity at a lower cost than photovoltaic power plants. A thermoelectric power plant might use energy harvested from ocean waves to pump cold water up through a heat exchanger/generator near the surface. The heat exchanger is made of thermoelectric materials which can use the temperature gradient between the warm and cold water to generate electricity. Credit: Liu. (CC BY 3.0) © 2014 Phys.org Explore furtherlast_img read more